Macaque V1 neurons can signal 'illusory' contours

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

WE describe here a new view of primary visual cortex (VI) based on measurements of neural responses in V1 to patterns called 'illusory contours' (Fig. 1a, b). Detection of an object's boundary contours is a fundamental visual task. Boundary contours are defined by discontinuities not only in luminance and colour, but also in texture, disparity and motion. Two theoretical approaches can account for illusory contour perception. The cognitive approach emphasizes top-down processes. An alternative emphasizes bottom-up processing. This latter view is supported by (1) stimulus constraints for illusory contour perception and (2) the discovery by von der Heydt and Peterhans of neurons in extrastriate visual area V2 (but not in V1) of macaque monkeys that respond to illusory contours. Using stimuli different from those used previously, we found illusory contour responses in about half the neurons studied in V1 of macaque monkeys. Therefore, there are neurons as early as V1 with the computational power to detect illusory contours and to help distinguish figure from ground.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)550-552
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume365
Issue number6446
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Macaca
Form Perception
Neurons
Haplorhini
Visual Cortex
Color

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Macaque V1 neurons can signal 'illusory' contours. / Grosof, D. H.; Shapley, Robert; Hawken, Michael.

In: Nature, Vol. 365, No. 6446, 1993, p. 550-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grosof, D. H. ; Shapley, Robert ; Hawken, Michael. / Macaque V1 neurons can signal 'illusory' contours. In: Nature. 1993 ; Vol. 365, No. 6446. pp. 550-552.
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