Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives To examine the distribution of birth weight in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) compared with the general US population, and to investigate the relationship between birth weight and severity of NAFLD. Study design A multicenter, cross-sectional study of children with biopsy-proven NAFLD enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network Database. Birth weight was categorized as low birth weight (LBW), normal birth weight (NBW), or high birth weight (HBW) and compared with the birth weight distribution in the general US population. The severity of liver histology was assessed by birth weight category. Results Children with NAFLD (n = 538) had overrepresentation of both LBW and HBW compared with the general US population (LBW, 9.3%; NBW, 75.8%; HBW, 14.9% vs LBW, 6.1%; NBW, 83.5%; HBW 10.5%; P <.0001). Children with HBW had significantly greater odds of having more severe steatosis (OR, 1.82, 95% CI. 1.15-2.88) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.21-3.40) compared with children with NBW. In addition, children with NAFLD and LBW had significantly greater odds of having advanced fibrosis (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.08-4.62). Conclusion Birth weight involves maternal and in utero factors that may have long-lasting consequences. Children with both LBW and HBW may be at increased risk for developing NAFLD. Among children with NAFLD, those with LBW or HBW appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-146.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume187
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Low Birth Weight Infant
Birth Weight
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Population

Keywords

  • birth weight
  • children
  • epidemiology
  • nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children. / Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN).

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 187, 01.08.2017, p. 141-146.e1.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN) 2017, 'Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 187, pp. 141-146.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.03.007
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). / Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 187. pp. 141-146.e1.
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title = "Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children",
abstract = "Objectives To examine the distribution of birth weight in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) compared with the general US population, and to investigate the relationship between birth weight and severity of NAFLD. Study design A multicenter, cross-sectional study of children with biopsy-proven NAFLD enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network Database. Birth weight was categorized as low birth weight (LBW), normal birth weight (NBW), or high birth weight (HBW) and compared with the birth weight distribution in the general US population. The severity of liver histology was assessed by birth weight category. Results Children with NAFLD (n = 538) had overrepresentation of both LBW and HBW compared with the general US population (LBW, 9.3{\%}; NBW, 75.8{\%}; HBW, 14.9{\%} vs LBW, 6.1{\%}; NBW, 83.5{\%}; HBW 10.5{\%}; P <.0001). Children with HBW had significantly greater odds of having more severe steatosis (OR, 1.82, 95{\%} CI. 1.15-2.88) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (OR, 2.03; 95{\%} CI, 1.21-3.40) compared with children with NBW. In addition, children with NAFLD and LBW had significantly greater odds of having advanced fibrosis (OR, 2.23; 95{\%} CI, 1.08-4.62). Conclusion Birth weight involves maternal and in utero factors that may have long-lasting consequences. Children with both LBW and HBW may be at increased risk for developing NAFLD. Among children with NAFLD, those with LBW or HBW appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease.",
keywords = "birth weight, children, epidemiology, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity",
author = "{Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN)} and Newton, {Kimberly P.} and Feldman, {Haruna S.} and Chambers, {Christina D.} and Laura Wilson and Cynthia Behling and Clark, {Jeanne M.} and Molleston, {Jean P.} and Naga Chalasani and Sanyal, {Arun J.} and Fishbein, {Mark H.} and Lavine, {Joel E.} and Schwimmer, {Jeffrey B.} and Abrams, {Stephanie H.} and Sarah Barlow and Ryan Himes and Rajesh Krisnamurthy and Leanel Maldonado and Rory Mahabir and April Carr and Kimberlee Bernstein and Kristin Bramlage and Kim Cecil and Stephanie DeVore and Rohit Kohli and Kathleen Lake and Daniel Podberesky and Alex Towbin and Stavra Xanthakos and Daniela Allende and Srinivasan Dasarathy and McCullough, {Arthur J.} and Mangesh Pagadala and Rish Pai and Cha'Ron Winston and Gerald Behr and Lavine, {Joel E.} and Lefkowitch, {Jay H.} and Ali Mencin and Elena Reynoso and Abdelmalek, {Manal F.} and Mustafa Bashir and Stephanie Buie and Diehl, {Anna Mae} and Cynthia Guy and Christopher Kigongo and David Malik and Pan, {Yi Ping} and Dawn Piercy and Mariko Kopping and Bradley Aouizerat",
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T1 - Low and High Birth Weights Are Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

AU - Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN)

AU - Newton, Kimberly P.

AU - Feldman, Haruna S.

AU - Chambers, Christina D.

AU - Wilson, Laura

AU - Behling, Cynthia

AU - Clark, Jeanne M.

AU - Molleston, Jean P.

AU - Chalasani, Naga

AU - Sanyal, Arun J.

AU - Fishbein, Mark H.

AU - Lavine, Joel E.

AU - Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

AU - Abrams, Stephanie H.

AU - Barlow, Sarah

AU - Himes, Ryan

AU - Krisnamurthy, Rajesh

AU - Maldonado, Leanel

AU - Mahabir, Rory

AU - Carr, April

AU - Bernstein, Kimberlee

AU - Bramlage, Kristin

AU - Cecil, Kim

AU - DeVore, Stephanie

AU - Kohli, Rohit

AU - Lake, Kathleen

AU - Podberesky, Daniel

AU - Towbin, Alex

AU - Xanthakos, Stavra

AU - Allende, Daniela

AU - Dasarathy, Srinivasan

AU - McCullough, Arthur J.

AU - Pagadala, Mangesh

AU - Pai, Rish

AU - Winston, Cha'Ron

AU - Behr, Gerald

AU - Lavine, Joel E.

AU - Lefkowitch, Jay H.

AU - Mencin, Ali

AU - Reynoso, Elena

AU - Abdelmalek, Manal F.

AU - Bashir, Mustafa

AU - Buie, Stephanie

AU - Diehl, Anna Mae

AU - Guy, Cynthia

AU - Kigongo, Christopher

AU - Malik, David

AU - Pan, Yi Ping

AU - Piercy, Dawn

AU - Kopping, Mariko

AU - Aouizerat, Bradley

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objectives To examine the distribution of birth weight in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) compared with the general US population, and to investigate the relationship between birth weight and severity of NAFLD. Study design A multicenter, cross-sectional study of children with biopsy-proven NAFLD enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network Database. Birth weight was categorized as low birth weight (LBW), normal birth weight (NBW), or high birth weight (HBW) and compared with the birth weight distribution in the general US population. The severity of liver histology was assessed by birth weight category. Results Children with NAFLD (n = 538) had overrepresentation of both LBW and HBW compared with the general US population (LBW, 9.3%; NBW, 75.8%; HBW, 14.9% vs LBW, 6.1%; NBW, 83.5%; HBW 10.5%; P <.0001). Children with HBW had significantly greater odds of having more severe steatosis (OR, 1.82, 95% CI. 1.15-2.88) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.21-3.40) compared with children with NBW. In addition, children with NAFLD and LBW had significantly greater odds of having advanced fibrosis (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.08-4.62). Conclusion Birth weight involves maternal and in utero factors that may have long-lasting consequences. Children with both LBW and HBW may be at increased risk for developing NAFLD. Among children with NAFLD, those with LBW or HBW appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease.

AB - Objectives To examine the distribution of birth weight in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) compared with the general US population, and to investigate the relationship between birth weight and severity of NAFLD. Study design A multicenter, cross-sectional study of children with biopsy-proven NAFLD enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network Database. Birth weight was categorized as low birth weight (LBW), normal birth weight (NBW), or high birth weight (HBW) and compared with the birth weight distribution in the general US population. The severity of liver histology was assessed by birth weight category. Results Children with NAFLD (n = 538) had overrepresentation of both LBW and HBW compared with the general US population (LBW, 9.3%; NBW, 75.8%; HBW, 14.9% vs LBW, 6.1%; NBW, 83.5%; HBW 10.5%; P <.0001). Children with HBW had significantly greater odds of having more severe steatosis (OR, 1.82, 95% CI. 1.15-2.88) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.21-3.40) compared with children with NBW. In addition, children with NAFLD and LBW had significantly greater odds of having advanced fibrosis (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.08-4.62). Conclusion Birth weight involves maternal and in utero factors that may have long-lasting consequences. Children with both LBW and HBW may be at increased risk for developing NAFLD. Among children with NAFLD, those with LBW or HBW appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease.

KW - birth weight

KW - children

KW - epidemiology

KW - nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

KW - nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

KW - obesity

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