Love thy neighbor? Ethnoracial diversity and trust reexamined

Maria Abascal, Delia Baldassarri

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    According to recent research, ethnoracial diversity negatively affects trust and social capital. This article challenges the current conception and measurement of “diversity” and invites scholars to rethink “social capital” in complex societies. It reproduces the analysis of Putnamand shows that the association between diversity and self-reported trust is a compositional artifact attributable to residential sorting: nonwhites report lower trust and are overrepresented in heterogeneous communities. The association between diversity and trust is better explained by differences between communities and their residents in terms of race/ethnicity, residential stability, and economic conditions; these classic indicators of inequality, not diversity, strongly and consistently predict self-reported trust. Diversity indexes also obscure the distinction between in-group and out-group contact. For whites, heterogeneity means more out-group neighbors; for nonwhites, heterogeneity means more in-group neighbors. Therefore, separate analyses were conducted by ethnoracial groups. Only for whites does living among out-group members—not in diverse communities per se—negatively predict trust.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)622-782
    Number of pages161
    JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
    Volume121
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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    love
    outgroup
    social capital
    community
    Group
    artifact
    ethnicity
    contact
    resident
    society
    economics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Abascal, M., & Baldassarri, D. (2015). Love thy neighbor? Ethnoracial diversity and trust reexamined. American Journal of Sociology, 121(3), 622-782.

    Love thy neighbor? Ethnoracial diversity and trust reexamined. / Abascal, Maria; Baldassarri, Delia.

    In: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 121, No. 3, 01.12.2015, p. 622-782.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abascal, M & Baldassarri, D 2015, 'Love thy neighbor? Ethnoracial diversity and trust reexamined', American Journal of Sociology, vol. 121, no. 3, pp. 622-782.
    Abascal, Maria ; Baldassarri, Delia. / Love thy neighbor? Ethnoracial diversity and trust reexamined. In: American Journal of Sociology. 2015 ; Vol. 121, No. 3. pp. 622-782.
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