Long-term stability of maternal prenatal steroid hormones from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project: Still valid after all these years

Laura R. Stroud, Catherine Solomon, Edmond Shenassa, George Papandonatos, Raymond Niaura, Lewis P. Lipsitt, Kaja LeWinn, Stephen L. Buka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Large epidemiological samples, including the National Collaborative Perinatal Project (NCPP), in which blood/serum was collected during pregnancy and offspring followed longitudinally, offer the unique opportunity to examine neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying prenatal "programming" of adult health and disease. However, in order to conduct longitudinal analyses, it is critical to determine the validity of maternal prenatal samples stored over long periods. We investigated the validity of cortisol, testosterone, and their binding globulins (corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG)) in maternal prenatal serum from the NCPP after over 40 years of storage. Study 1 included 64 maternal serum samples collected on the day of delivery; study 2 involved 1099 third trimester serum samples collected between gestational weeks 31 and 36. Across both studies, cortisol and testosterone concentrations were consistent with values from published studies of fresh samples collected at similar points in gestation. CBG and SHBG were present, but showed some differences from published studies. Results support the validity of cortisol and testosterone values following 40+ years of storage. Results also provide validation for future longitudinal tests of prenatal "programming" hypotheses within the NCPP. Stability of steroid hormones over decades suggests that stored samples from other longitudinal studies may also allow opportunities to investigate links between prenatal steroids and long-term offspring outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-150
Number of pages11
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Steroids
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Mothers
Hormones
Transcortin
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Serum
Pregnancy
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Reproducibility of Results
Longitudinal Studies
Health

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Glucocorticoid
  • Maternal
  • Pregnancy
  • Prenatal
  • Programming
  • Serum
  • Storage
  • Testosterone
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Long-term stability of maternal prenatal steroid hormones from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project : Still valid after all these years. / Stroud, Laura R.; Solomon, Catherine; Shenassa, Edmond; Papandonatos, George; Niaura, Raymond; Lipsitt, Lewis P.; LeWinn, Kaja; Buka, Stephen L.

In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 140-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stroud, Laura R. ; Solomon, Catherine ; Shenassa, Edmond ; Papandonatos, George ; Niaura, Raymond ; Lipsitt, Lewis P. ; LeWinn, Kaja ; Buka, Stephen L. / Long-term stability of maternal prenatal steroid hormones from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project : Still valid after all these years. In: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2007 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 140-150.
@article{a3a814f8dbb14fe99372508e1acd9d0f,
title = "Long-term stability of maternal prenatal steroid hormones from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project: Still valid after all these years",
abstract = "Large epidemiological samples, including the National Collaborative Perinatal Project (NCPP), in which blood/serum was collected during pregnancy and offspring followed longitudinally, offer the unique opportunity to examine neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying prenatal {"}programming{"} of adult health and disease. However, in order to conduct longitudinal analyses, it is critical to determine the validity of maternal prenatal samples stored over long periods. We investigated the validity of cortisol, testosterone, and their binding globulins (corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG)) in maternal prenatal serum from the NCPP after over 40 years of storage. Study 1 included 64 maternal serum samples collected on the day of delivery; study 2 involved 1099 third trimester serum samples collected between gestational weeks 31 and 36. Across both studies, cortisol and testosterone concentrations were consistent with values from published studies of fresh samples collected at similar points in gestation. CBG and SHBG were present, but showed some differences from published studies. Results support the validity of cortisol and testosterone values following 40+ years of storage. Results also provide validation for future longitudinal tests of prenatal {"}programming{"} hypotheses within the NCPP. Stability of steroid hormones over decades suggests that stored samples from other longitudinal studies may also allow opportunities to investigate links between prenatal steroids and long-term offspring outcomes.",
keywords = "Cortisol, Glucocorticoid, Maternal, Pregnancy, Prenatal, Programming, Serum, Storage, Testosterone, Validity",
author = "Stroud, {Laura R.} and Catherine Solomon and Edmond Shenassa and George Papandonatos and Raymond Niaura and Lipsitt, {Lewis P.} and Kaja LeWinn and Buka, {Stephen L.}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.psyneuen.2006.11.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "140--150",
journal = "Psychoneuroendocrinology",
issn = "0306-4530",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term stability of maternal prenatal steroid hormones from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project

T2 - Still valid after all these years

AU - Stroud, Laura R.

AU - Solomon, Catherine

AU - Shenassa, Edmond

AU - Papandonatos, George

AU - Niaura, Raymond

AU - Lipsitt, Lewis P.

AU - LeWinn, Kaja

AU - Buka, Stephen L.

PY - 2007/2

Y1 - 2007/2

N2 - Large epidemiological samples, including the National Collaborative Perinatal Project (NCPP), in which blood/serum was collected during pregnancy and offspring followed longitudinally, offer the unique opportunity to examine neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying prenatal "programming" of adult health and disease. However, in order to conduct longitudinal analyses, it is critical to determine the validity of maternal prenatal samples stored over long periods. We investigated the validity of cortisol, testosterone, and their binding globulins (corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG)) in maternal prenatal serum from the NCPP after over 40 years of storage. Study 1 included 64 maternal serum samples collected on the day of delivery; study 2 involved 1099 third trimester serum samples collected between gestational weeks 31 and 36. Across both studies, cortisol and testosterone concentrations were consistent with values from published studies of fresh samples collected at similar points in gestation. CBG and SHBG were present, but showed some differences from published studies. Results support the validity of cortisol and testosterone values following 40+ years of storage. Results also provide validation for future longitudinal tests of prenatal "programming" hypotheses within the NCPP. Stability of steroid hormones over decades suggests that stored samples from other longitudinal studies may also allow opportunities to investigate links between prenatal steroids and long-term offspring outcomes.

AB - Large epidemiological samples, including the National Collaborative Perinatal Project (NCPP), in which blood/serum was collected during pregnancy and offspring followed longitudinally, offer the unique opportunity to examine neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying prenatal "programming" of adult health and disease. However, in order to conduct longitudinal analyses, it is critical to determine the validity of maternal prenatal samples stored over long periods. We investigated the validity of cortisol, testosterone, and their binding globulins (corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG)) in maternal prenatal serum from the NCPP after over 40 years of storage. Study 1 included 64 maternal serum samples collected on the day of delivery; study 2 involved 1099 third trimester serum samples collected between gestational weeks 31 and 36. Across both studies, cortisol and testosterone concentrations were consistent with values from published studies of fresh samples collected at similar points in gestation. CBG and SHBG were present, but showed some differences from published studies. Results support the validity of cortisol and testosterone values following 40+ years of storage. Results also provide validation for future longitudinal tests of prenatal "programming" hypotheses within the NCPP. Stability of steroid hormones over decades suggests that stored samples from other longitudinal studies may also allow opportunities to investigate links between prenatal steroids and long-term offspring outcomes.

KW - Cortisol

KW - Glucocorticoid

KW - Maternal

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Prenatal

KW - Programming

KW - Serum

KW - Storage

KW - Testosterone

KW - Validity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847192513&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847192513&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2006.11.008

DO - 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2006.11.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 17270355

AN - SCOPUS:33847192513

VL - 32

SP - 140

EP - 150

JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology

JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology

SN - 0306-4530

IS - 2

ER -