Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips

Sukanta Bhattacharjee, Jack Tang, Mohamed Ibrahim, Krishnendu Chakrabarty, Ramesh Karri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It is expected that as digital microfluidic biochips (DMFBs) mature, the hardware design flow will begin to resemble the current practice in the semiconductor industry: design teams send chip layouts to third party foundries for fabrication. These foundries are untrusted, and threaten to steal valuable intellectual property (IP). In a DMFB, the IP consists of not only hardware layouts, but also of the biochemical assays (bioassays) that are intended to be executed on-chip. DMFB designers therefore must defend these protocols against theft. We propose to 'lock' biochemical assays through random insertion of dummy mix-split operations, subject to several design rules. We experimentally evaluate the proposed locking mechanism, and show how a high level of protection can be achieved even on bioassays with low complexity. We offer guidance on the number of dummy mixsplits required to secure a bioassay for the lifetime of a patent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
Volume2018-May
ISBN (Electronic)9781538637289
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2018
Event23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018 - Bremen, Germany
Duration: May 28 2018Jun 1 2018

Other

Other23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018
CountryGermany
CityBremen
Period5/28/186/1/18

Fingerprint

Digital microfluidics
Biochips
Assays
Intellectual property
Foundries
Hardware
Semiconductor materials
Fabrication
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Software

Cite this

Bhattacharjee, S., Tang, J., Ibrahim, M., Chakrabarty, K., & Karri, R. (2018). Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips. In Proceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018 (Vol. 2018-May, pp. 1-6). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ETS.2018.8400686

Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips. / Bhattacharjee, Sukanta; Tang, Jack; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Karri, Ramesh.

Proceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018. Vol. 2018-May Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. p. 1-6.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bhattacharjee, S, Tang, J, Ibrahim, M, Chakrabarty, K & Karri, R 2018, Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips. in Proceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018. vol. 2018-May, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1-6, 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018, Bremen, Germany, 5/28/18. https://doi.org/10.1109/ETS.2018.8400686
Bhattacharjee S, Tang J, Ibrahim M, Chakrabarty K, Karri R. Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips. In Proceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018. Vol. 2018-May. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2018. p. 1-6 https://doi.org/10.1109/ETS.2018.8400686
Bhattacharjee, Sukanta ; Tang, Jack ; Ibrahim, Mohamed ; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu ; Karri, Ramesh. / Locking of biochemical assays for digital microfluidic biochips. Proceedings - 2018 23rd IEEE European Test Symposium, ETS 2018. Vol. 2018-May Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. pp. 1-6
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