Liquefaction potential of recent fills versus natural sands located in high-seismicity regions using shear-wave velocity

R. Dobry, Tarek Abdoun, K. H. Stokoe, R. E.S. Moss, M. Hatton, H. El Ganainy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The liquefaction potential of clean and silty sands is examined on the basis of the field measurement of the shear-wave velocity, Vs. The starting point is the database of 225 case histories supporting the Andrus-Stokoe Vs-based liquefaction chart for sands, silts, and gravels. Only clean and silty sands with nonplastic fines are considered, resulting in a reduced database of 110 case histories, which are plotted separately by type of deposit. A line of constant cyclic shear strain, γcl ≈ 0.03%, is recommended for liquefaction evaluation of recent uncompacted clean and silty sand fills and earthquake magnitude, Mw = 7.5. The geologically recent natural silty sand sites in the Imperial Valley of southern California have significantly higher liquefaction resistance as a result of preshaking caused by the high seismic activity in the valley. A line of constant cyclic shear strain, γcl ≈ 0.1-0.2%, is recommended for practical use in the Imperial Valley. Additional research including revisiting available Vs-based and penetration-based databases is proposed to generalize the results of the paper and develop liquefaction charts that account more realistically for deposit type, seismic history, and geologic age.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number04014112
    JournalJournal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering
    Volume141
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    Shear waves
    Liquefaction
    liquefaction
    wave velocity
    seismicity
    S-wave
    fill
    Sand
    sand
    Shear strain
    shear strain
    valley
    Deposits
    history
    earthquake magnitude
    Gravel
    sand and gravel
    Earthquakes
    penetration

    Keywords

    • Artificial fills
    • Imperial Valley
    • Liquefaction charts
    • Natural sands
    • Seismicity
    • Shear-wave velocity
    • Silty sands

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Environmental Science(all)
    • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

    Cite this

    Liquefaction potential of recent fills versus natural sands located in high-seismicity regions using shear-wave velocity. / Dobry, R.; Abdoun, Tarek; Stokoe, K. H.; Moss, R. E.S.; Hatton, M.; El Ganainy, H.

    In: Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Vol. 141, No. 3, 04014112, 01.01.2015.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dobry, R. ; Abdoun, Tarek ; Stokoe, K. H. ; Moss, R. E.S. ; Hatton, M. ; El Ganainy, H. / Liquefaction potential of recent fills versus natural sands located in high-seismicity regions using shear-wave velocity. In: Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. 2015 ; Vol. 141, No. 3.
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