Links between physical fitness and cardiovascular reactivity and recovery to psychological stressors

A meta-analysis

Kathleen Forcier, Laura R. Stroud, George D. Papandonatos, Brian Hitsman, Meredith Reiches, Jenelle Krishnamoorthy, Raymond Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A meta-analysis of published studies with adult human participants was conducted to evaluate whether physical fitness attenuates cardiovascular reactivity and improves recovery from acute psychological stressors. Thirty-three studies met selection criteria; 18 were included in recovery analyses. Effect sizes and moderator influences were calculated by using meta-analysis software. A fixed effects model was fit initially; however, between-studies heterogeneity could not be explained even after inclusion of moderators. Therefore, to account for residual heterogeneity, a random effects model was estimated. Under this model, fit individuals showed significantly attenuated heart rate and systolic blood pressure reactivity and a trend toward attenuated diastolic blood pressure reactivity. Fit individuals also showed faster heart rate recovery, but there were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure recovery. No significant moderators emerged. Results have important implications for elucidating mechanisms underlying effects of fitness on cardiovascular disease and suggest that fitness may be an important confound in studies of stress reactivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)723-739
Number of pages17
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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Physical Fitness
Meta-Analysis
Psychology
Blood Pressure
Heart Rate
Patient Selection
Cardiovascular Diseases
Software

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular reactivity
  • Cardiovascular recovery
  • Fitness
  • Review
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Links between physical fitness and cardiovascular reactivity and recovery to psychological stressors : A meta-analysis. / Forcier, Kathleen; Stroud, Laura R.; Papandonatos, George D.; Hitsman, Brian; Reiches, Meredith; Krishnamoorthy, Jenelle; Niaura, Raymond.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 723-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forcier, Kathleen ; Stroud, Laura R. ; Papandonatos, George D. ; Hitsman, Brian ; Reiches, Meredith ; Krishnamoorthy, Jenelle ; Niaura, Raymond. / Links between physical fitness and cardiovascular reactivity and recovery to psychological stressors : A meta-analysis. In: Health Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 723-739.
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