Linking mental health and after school systems for children in urban poverty

Preventing problems, promoting possibilities

Stacy L. Frazier, Elise Cappella, Marc S. Atkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current mental health system is failing to meet the extensive needs of children living in urban poverty. After school programs, whose mission includes children's socialization, peer relations, and adaptive functioning, are uniquely positioned to support and promote children's healthy development. We propose that public sector mental health resources can be reallocated to support after school settings, and we offer specific examples and recommendations from an ongoing federally funded program of research to illustrate how mental health consultation can support publicly funded after school programs. In light of the increase in resources of urban, poor communities, consultation to publicly funded after school programs can contribute to the mental health goals of keeping children safe and supervised, promoting their healthy development through academically and socially enriching activities, and identifying children in need of more intensive mental health services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-399
Number of pages11
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Poverty
Mental Health
Referral and Consultation
Socialization
Health Resources
Public Sector
Mental Health Services
Child Development
Research

Keywords

  • After school programs
  • Children's mental health services
  • Poverty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

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