Lineage-specific expansion of proteins exported to erythrocytes in malaria parasites

Tobias J. Sargeant, Matthias Marti, Elisabet Caler, Jane M. Carlton, Ken Simpson, Terence P. Speed, Alan F. Cowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of malaria in humans. After invasion into erythrocytes, asexual parasite stages drastically alter their host cell and export remodeling and virulence proteins. Previously, we have reported identification and functional analysis of a short motif necessary for export of proteins out of the parasite and into the red blood cell. Results: We have developed software for the prediction of exported proteins in the genus Plasmodium, and identified exported proteins conserved between malaria parasites infecting rodents and the two major causes of human malaria, P. falciparum and P. vivax. This conserved 'exportome' is confined to a few subtelomeric chromosomal regions in P. falciparum and the synteny of these and surrounding regions is conserved in P. vivax. We have identified a novel gene family PHIST (for Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric family) that shares a unique domain with 72 paralogs in P. faliparum and 39 in P. vivax; however, there is only one member in each of the three species studied from the P. berghei lineage. Conclusion: These data suggest radiation of genes encoding remodeling and virulence factors from a small number of loci in a common Plasmodium ancestor, and imply a closer phylogenetic relationship between the P. vivax and P. falciparum lineages than previously believed. The presence of a conserved 'exportome' in the genus Plasmodium has important implications for our understanding of both common mechanisms and species-specific differences in host-parasite interactions, and may be crucial in developing novel antimalarial drugs to this infectious disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberR12
JournalGenome Biology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2006

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Plasmodium
malaria
Plasmodium falciparum
Plasmodium vivax
Malaria
parasite
Parasites
erythrocytes
Erythrocytes
parasites
protein
virulence
Proteins
proteins
Synteny
host-parasite interaction
Host-Parasite Interactions
antimalarials
Falciparum Malaria
gene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Sargeant, T. J., Marti, M., Caler, E., Carlton, J. M., Simpson, K., Speed, T. P., & Cowman, A. F. (2006). Lineage-specific expansion of proteins exported to erythrocytes in malaria parasites. Genome Biology, 7(2), [R12]. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2006-7-2-r12

Lineage-specific expansion of proteins exported to erythrocytes in malaria parasites. / Sargeant, Tobias J.; Marti, Matthias; Caler, Elisabet; Carlton, Jane M.; Simpson, Ken; Speed, Terence P.; Cowman, Alan F.

In: Genome Biology, Vol. 7, No. 2, R12, 20.02.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sargeant, TJ, Marti, M, Caler, E, Carlton, JM, Simpson, K, Speed, TP & Cowman, AF 2006, 'Lineage-specific expansion of proteins exported to erythrocytes in malaria parasites', Genome Biology, vol. 7, no. 2, R12. https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2006-7-2-r12
Sargeant, Tobias J. ; Marti, Matthias ; Caler, Elisabet ; Carlton, Jane M. ; Simpson, Ken ; Speed, Terence P. ; Cowman, Alan F. / Lineage-specific expansion of proteins exported to erythrocytes in malaria parasites. In: Genome Biology. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 2.
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