Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk: A large multicentre case control study in India

on behalf of the INDOX Cancer Research Network Collaborators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The lower incidence of breast cancer in Asian populations where the intake of animal products is lower than that of Western populations has led some to suggest that a vegetarian diet might reduce breast cancer risk. Methods: Between 2011 and 2014 we conducted a multicentre hospital based case-control study in eight cancer centres in India. Eligible cases were women aged 30-70 years, with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer (ICD10 C50). Controls were frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence and chosen from the accompanying attendants of the patients with cancer or those patients in the general hospital without cancer. Information about dietary, lifestyle, reproductive and socio-demographic factors were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of breast cancer in relation to lifelong vegetarianism, adjusting for known risk factors for the disease. Results: The study included 2101 cases and 2255 controls. The mean age at recruitment was similar in cases (49.7 years (SE 9.7)) and controls (49.8 years (SE 9.1)). About a quarter of the population were lifelong vegetarians and the rates varied significantly by region. On multivariate analysis, with adjustment for known risk factors for the disease, the risk of breast cancer was not decreased in lifelong vegetarians (OR 1.09 (95% CI 0.93-1.29)). Conclusions: Lifelong exposure to a vegetarian diet appears to have little, if any effect on the risk of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalBMC Women's Health
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2017

Fingerprint

Vegetarian Diet
Case-Control Studies
India
Breast Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Population
Neoplasms
General Hospitals
Life Style
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Confidence Intervals
Interviews
Incidence

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Diet
  • India
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk : A large multicentre case control study in India. / on behalf of the INDOX Cancer Research Network Collaborators.

In: BMC Women's Health, Vol. 17, No. 1, 6, 18.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

on behalf of the INDOX Cancer Research Network Collaborators. / Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk : A large multicentre case control study in India. In: BMC Women's Health. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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title = "Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk: A large multicentre case control study in India",
abstract = "Background: The lower incidence of breast cancer in Asian populations where the intake of animal products is lower than that of Western populations has led some to suggest that a vegetarian diet might reduce breast cancer risk. Methods: Between 2011 and 2014 we conducted a multicentre hospital based case-control study in eight cancer centres in India. Eligible cases were women aged 30-70 years, with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer (ICD10 C50). Controls were frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence and chosen from the accompanying attendants of the patients with cancer or those patients in the general hospital without cancer. Information about dietary, lifestyle, reproductive and socio-demographic factors were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals for the risk of breast cancer in relation to lifelong vegetarianism, adjusting for known risk factors for the disease. Results: The study included 2101 cases and 2255 controls. The mean age at recruitment was similar in cases (49.7 years (SE 9.7)) and controls (49.8 years (SE 9.1)). About a quarter of the population were lifelong vegetarians and the rates varied significantly by region. On multivariate analysis, with adjustment for known risk factors for the disease, the risk of breast cancer was not decreased in lifelong vegetarians (OR 1.09 (95{\%} CI 0.93-1.29)). Conclusions: Lifelong exposure to a vegetarian diet appears to have little, if any effect on the risk of breast cancer.",
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AU - on behalf of the INDOX Cancer Research Network Collaborators

AU - Gathani, Toral

AU - Barnes, Isobel

AU - Ali, Raghib

AU - Arumugham, Rajkumar

AU - Chacko, Raju

AU - Digumarti, Raghunadharao

AU - Jivarajani, Parimal

AU - Kannan, Ravi

AU - Loknatha, Dasappa

AU - Malhotra, Hemant

AU - Mathew, Beela S.

AU - Ananthakrishnan, Radhu

AU - Balasubramanian, Sivensen

AU - D'Cruz, Anil

AU - Doshi, Gita

AU - Foulkes, Mary

AU - Ganesan, Trivadi

AU - Gupta, Sanjay

AU - Chandramohan, K.

AU - Mallandas, Mohan

AU - Mehta, Shaesta

AU - Nair, Reena

AU - Sebastian, Paul

AU - Sharma, Atul

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