Lexical access in early stages of visual word processing: a single-trial correlational MEG study of heteronym recognition

Olla Solomyak, Alec Marantz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We present an MEG study of heteronym recognition, aiming to distinguish between two theories of lexical access: the 'early access' theory, which entails that lexical access occurs at early (pre 200 ms) stages of processing, and the 'late access' theory, which interprets this early activity as orthographic word-form identification rather than genuine lexical access. A correlational analysis method was employed to examine effects of the heteronyms' form and lexical properties on brain activity. We find support for the 'late access' view, in that lexical properties did not affect processing until after 300 ms, while earlier activation was primarily modulated by orthographic form.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-6
Number of pages6
JournalBrain and Language
Volume108
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Word Processing
Brain
activation
brain
Visual Word Processing
Lexical Access
Orthographic

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Brain Mapping
  • Humans
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Phonetics
  • Reaction Time
  • Reading
  • Recognition (Psychology)
  • Semantics
  • Statistics as Topic

Cite this

Lexical access in early stages of visual word processing : a single-trial correlational MEG study of heteronym recognition. / Solomyak, Olla; Marantz, Alec.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 108, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 191-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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