Level I fieldwork today: A study of contexts and perceptions

Caryn R. Johnson, Kristie Koenig, Catherine Verrier Piersol, Susan E. Santalucia, Wendy Wachter-Schutz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The last comprehensive examination of the Level I fieldwork experience was performed 15 years ago (Shalik, 1990) and addressed the different types of settings in which fieldwork occurred; amounts and types of supervision; structure and scheduling of the Level I experiences; and the effects of supervising Level I students on productivity. Although every occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant student encounters a number of Level I fieldwork opportunities, little is available describing the process and contexts of the Level I fieldwork experience today. This study, which examines 1,002 student reports on Level I fieldwork experiences, finds that Level I fieldwork today occurs in a wide variety of physical disability, pediatric, mental health, and emerging practice settings. Findings also indicate that, whereas most fieldwork educators are occupational therapy practitioners, more fieldwork educators are non-occupational therapists than in the past. Furthermore, although students reported opportunities to practice observation and communication across all settings, practice of other clinical skills was specific to type of settings, and opportunities to practice were limited. Student perceptions about opportunities for experiencing occupation-based practice, observation of theory in practice, and how students value different types of fieldwork experiences are addressed. In addition, this study explores the expansion of Level I fieldwork into emerging practice arenas and how students perceive those experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-287
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume60
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Students
Occupational Therapy
Observation
Clinical Competence
Occupations
Mental Health
Communication
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • occupational therapy
  • fieldwork
  • fieldwork educators
  • level I fieldwork
  • occupational therapy practitioners
  • clinical practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Johnson, C. R., Koenig, K., Piersol, C. V., Santalucia, S. E., & Wachter-Schutz, W. (2006). Level I fieldwork today: A study of contexts and perceptions. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(3), 275-287.

Level I fieldwork today : A study of contexts and perceptions. / Johnson, Caryn R.; Koenig, Kristie; Piersol, Catherine Verrier; Santalucia, Susan E.; Wachter-Schutz, Wendy.

In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 60, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 275-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Johnson, CR, Koenig, K, Piersol, CV, Santalucia, SE & Wachter-Schutz, W 2006, 'Level I fieldwork today: A study of contexts and perceptions', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 275-287.
Johnson CR, Koenig K, Piersol CV, Santalucia SE, Wachter-Schutz W. Level I fieldwork today: A study of contexts and perceptions. American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 2006 May;60(3):275-287.
Johnson, Caryn R. ; Koenig, Kristie ; Piersol, Catherine Verrier ; Santalucia, Susan E. ; Wachter-Schutz, Wendy. / Level I fieldwork today : A study of contexts and perceptions. In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 2006 ; Vol. 60, No. 3. pp. 275-287.
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