Learnometrics: Metrics for learning objects

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The field of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) in general, has the potential to solve one of the most important challenges of our time: enable everyone to learn anything, anytime, anywhere. However, if we look back at more than 50 years of research in TEL, it is not clear where we are in terms of reaching our goal and whether we are, indeed, moving forward. The pace at which technology and new ideas evolve have created a rapid, even exponential, rate of change. This rapid change, together with the natural difficulty to measure the impact of technology in something as complex as learning, has lead to a field with abundance of new, good ideas and scarcity of evaluation studies. This lack of evaluation has resulted into the duplication of efforts and a sense of no "ground truth" or 'basic theory' of TEL. This article is an attempt to stop, look back and measure, if not the impact, at least the status of a small fraction of TEL, Learning Object Technologies, in the real world. The measured apparent inexistence of the reuse paradox, the two phase linear growth of repositories or the ineffective meta- data quality assessment of humans are clear reminders that even bright theoretical discussions do not compensate the lack of experimentation and measurement. Both theoretical and empirical studies should go hand in hand in order to advance the status of the field. This article is an invitation to other researchers in the field to apply Informetric techniques to measure, understand and apply in their tools the vast amount of information generated by the usage of Technology Enhanced Learning systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK'11 - Banff, AB, Canada
Duration: Feb 27 2011Mar 1 2011

Other

Other1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK'11
CountryCanada
CityBanff, AB
Period2/27/113/1/11

Fingerprint

Metadata
Learning systems

Keywords

  • Learning object
  • Metrics
  • Repositories
  • Reuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Ochoa, X. (2011). Learnometrics: Metrics for learning objects. In LAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (pp. 1-8) https://doi.org/10.1145/2090116.2090117

Learnometrics : Metrics for learning objects. / Ochoa, Xavier.

LAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. 2011. p. 1-8.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ochoa, X 2011, Learnometrics: Metrics for learning objects. in LAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. pp. 1-8, 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, LAK'11, Banff, AB, Canada, 2/27/11. https://doi.org/10.1145/2090116.2090117
Ochoa X. Learnometrics: Metrics for learning objects. In LAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. 2011. p. 1-8 https://doi.org/10.1145/2090116.2090117
Ochoa, Xavier. / Learnometrics : Metrics for learning objects. LAK'11 - Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. 2011. pp. 1-8
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