Learning resilience in the face of bias: Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning

Gabriela T. Richard, Christopher Hoadley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Online digital gaming environments have been proposed as an important form of computer-supported collaborative learning, but these environments have been shown to marginalize some learners, most notably women or girls, as well as ethnic or racial minorities. Furthermore, game-based competencies and identities have been shown to be important for digitally-mediated learning activities and trajectories in computer science and technology. In this paper we look at how supportive communities can improve resilience by mitigating stereotype threat, and thereby helping to protect vulnerable groups from the negative effects of implicit and explicit bias in gaming culture and game-based learning activities. Our findings demonstrate that a female-supportive gaming community can foster equitable gaming identification and self-concept, and we propose that similar models can be used with other marginalized groups (i.e., ethnic/racial minorities).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationExploring the Material Conditions of Learning
Subtitle of host publicationComputer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsOskar Lindwall, Paivi Hakkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine, Sten Ludvigsen
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages451-458
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355069
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event11th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning, CSCL 2015 - Gothenburg, Sweden
Duration: Jun 7 2015Jun 11 2015

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference11th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning, CSCL 2015
CountrySweden
CityGothenburg
Period6/7/156/11/15

Fingerprint

Computer science
resilience
Trajectories
trend
minority
learning
community
self-concept
computer science
stereotype
ethnic group
threat
Group

Keywords

  • 21 century learning
  • Communities of practice
  • Digital games
  • Ethnicity
  • Gender
  • Informal learning
  • Interest-driven learning
  • Online gaming
  • Race
  • Social identity theory
  • Stereotype threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

Cite this

Richard, G. T., & Hoadley, C. (2015). Learning resilience in the face of bias: Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning. In O. Lindwall, P. Hakkinen, T. Koschmann, P. Tchounikine, & S. Ludvigsen (Eds.), Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings (pp. 451-458). (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL; Vol. 1). International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).

Learning resilience in the face of bias : Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning. / Richard, Gabriela T.; Hoadley, Christopher.

Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings. ed. / Oskar Lindwall; Paivi Hakkinen; Timothy Koschmann; Pierre Tchounikine; Sten Ludvigsen. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), 2015. p. 451-458 (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL; Vol. 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Richard, GT & Hoadley, C 2015, Learning resilience in the face of bias: Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning. in O Lindwall, P Hakkinen, T Koschmann, P Tchounikine & S Ludvigsen (eds), Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL, vol. 1, International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), pp. 451-458, 11th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning, CSCL 2015, Gothenburg, Sweden, 6/7/15.
Richard GT, Hoadley C. Learning resilience in the face of bias: Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning. In Lindwall O, Hakkinen P, Koschmann T, Tchounikine P, Ludvigsen S, editors, Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS). 2015. p. 451-458. (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL).
Richard, Gabriela T. ; Hoadley, Christopher. / Learning resilience in the face of bias : Online gaming, protective communities and interest-driven digital learning. Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference 2015, CSCL 2015 - Conference Proceedings. editor / Oskar Lindwall ; Paivi Hakkinen ; Timothy Koschmann ; Pierre Tchounikine ; Sten Ludvigsen. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), 2015. pp. 451-458 (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL).
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