Learning, Memory, and Synesthesia

Nathan Witthoft, Jonathan Winawer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People with color-grapheme synesthesia experience color when viewing written letters or numerals, usually with a particular color evoked by each grapheme. Here, we report on data from 11 color-grapheme synesthetes who had startlingly similar color-grapheme pairings traceable to childhood toys containing colored letters. These are the first and only data to show learned synesthesia of this kind in more than a single individual. Whereas some researchers have focused on genetic and perceptual aspects of synesthesia, our results indicate that a complete explanation of synesthesia must also incorporate a central role for learning and memory. We argue that these two positions can be reconciled by thinking of synesthesia as the automatic retrieval of highly specific mnemonic associations, in which perceptual contents are brought to mind in a manner akin to mental imagery or the perceptual-reinstatement effects found in memory studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-265
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Science
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Color
Learning
Play and Playthings
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Research Personnel
Synesthesia
Learning and Memory
Synaesthesia
Grapheme
Letters

Keywords

  • consciousness
  • learning
  • memory
  • visual perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Learning, Memory, and Synesthesia. / Witthoft, Nathan; Winawer, Jonathan.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2013, p. 258-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Witthoft, N & Winawer, J 2013, 'Learning, Memory, and Synesthesia', Psychological Science, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 258-265. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797612452573
Witthoft, Nathan ; Winawer, Jonathan. / Learning, Memory, and Synesthesia. In: Psychological Science. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 258-265.
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