Latinos, Inc. The marketing and making of a people

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Both Hollywood and corporate America are taking note of the marketing power of the growing Latino population in the United States. And as salsa takes over both the dance floor and the condiment shelf, the influence of Latin culture is gaining momentum in American society as a whole. Yet the increasing visibility of Latinos in mainstream culture has not been accompanied by a similar level of economic parity or political enfranchisement. In this important, original, and entertaining book, Arlene D́vila provides a critical examination of the Hispanic marketing industry and of its role in the making and marketing of U.S. Latinos. Dávila finds that Latinos' increased popularity in the marketplace is simultaneously accompanied by their growing exotification and invisibility. She scrutinizes the complex interests that are involved in the public representation of Latinos as a generic and culturally distinct people and questions the homogeneity of the different Latino subnationalities that supposedly comprise the same people and group of consumers. In a fascinating discussion of how populations have become reconfigured as market segments, she shows that the market and marketing discourse become important terrains where Latinos debate their social identities and public standing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity of California Press
ISBN (Print)9780520274693
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Latinos
Marketing
Hollywood
Industry
Economics
Discourse
Note-taking
Dance
Homogeneity
Visibility
Invisibility
Parity
Social Identity
Latin Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Dávila, A. (2012). Latinos, Inc. The marketing and making of a people. University of California Press.

Latinos, Inc. The marketing and making of a people. / Dávila, Arlene.

University of California Press, 2012.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Dávila, A 2012, Latinos, Inc. The marketing and making of a people. University of California Press.
Dávila A. Latinos, Inc. The marketing and making of a people. University of California Press, 2012.
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