Latino electoral participation: Variations on demographics and ethnicity

Jan Leighley, Jonathan Nagler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using the 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study, the 2012 American National Election Study, and the 2012 Current Population Survey, we document the demographic factors that influenced Latino (native-born and immigrant) voter turnout and participation in the 2012 presidential election. We estimate multivariable models of turnout and participation, including standard demographic characteristics (education, income, age, gender, marital status) as explanatory variables. Our findings indicate that the relationships between these characteristics and participation are much less consistent across these datasets than the conventional wisdom would suggest. Understanding these results likely requires survey data-with large sample sizes-including information on the resources (including education and income) available to immigrants in their home countries to better understand the lingering influences of immigrants' experiences in their countries of origin on voter turnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-164
Number of pages17
JournalRSF
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

ethnicity
immigrant
voter turnout
participation
election research
income
country of origin
demographic factors
presidential election
marital status
wisdom
education
gender
resources
experience

Keywords

  • 2012 presidential election
  • Country of origin
  • Immigrants
  • Latino
  • Party contact
  • Political participation
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Voter turnout

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Latino electoral participation : Variations on demographics and ethnicity. / Leighley, Jan; Nagler, Jonathan.

In: RSF, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.06.2016, p. 148-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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