Larvicidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are released in root exudates of transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, potato, and rice but not of B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco

Deepak Saxena, C. Neal Stewart, Illimar Altosaar, Qingyao Shu, G. Stotzky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Larvicidal proteins encoded by cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis were released in root exudates from transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, rice, and potato but not from B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco. Nonsterile soil and sterile hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis corn, rice, or potato had been grown were immunologically positive for the presence of the Cry proteins; from B. thuringiensis corn and rice, the soil and solution were toxic to the larva of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta), and from potato, to the larva of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), representative lepidoptera and coleoptera, respectively. No toxin was detected immunologically or by larvicidal assay in soil or hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, or tobacco, as well as all near-isogenic non-B. thuringiensis plant counterparts or no plants, had been grown. All plant species had the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, except rice, which had the ubiquitin promoter from maize. The reasons for the differences between species in the exudation from roots of the toxins are not known. The released toxins persisted in soil as the result of their binding on surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances), which reduced their biodegradation. The release of the toxins in root exudates could enhance the control of target insect pests, constitute a hazard to nontarget organisms, and/or increase the selection of toxin-resistant target insects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-387
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Bacillus thuringiensis
Tobacco
root exudates
Exudates and Transudates
Bacilli
Solanum tuberosum
canola
Cotton
Zea mays
tobacco
cotton
genetically modified organisms
potatoes
toxins
Soils
rice
corn
Soil
Hydroponics
Manduca

Keywords

  • Bacillus thuringiensis
  • Hydroponics
  • Insecticidal proteins
  • Root exudates
  • Soil
  • Surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances)
  • Transgenic Bt plants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Larvicidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are released in root exudates of transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, potato, and rice but not of B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco. / Saxena, Deepak; Stewart, C. Neal; Altosaar, Illimar; Shu, Qingyao; Stotzky, G.

In: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Vol. 42, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 383-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{49e12bb0343a480aa3856728a935537f,
title = "Larvicidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are released in root exudates of transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, potato, and rice but not of B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco",
abstract = "Larvicidal proteins encoded by cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis were released in root exudates from transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, rice, and potato but not from B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco. Nonsterile soil and sterile hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis corn, rice, or potato had been grown were immunologically positive for the presence of the Cry proteins; from B. thuringiensis corn and rice, the soil and solution were toxic to the larva of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta), and from potato, to the larva of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), representative lepidoptera and coleoptera, respectively. No toxin was detected immunologically or by larvicidal assay in soil or hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, or tobacco, as well as all near-isogenic non-B. thuringiensis plant counterparts or no plants, had been grown. All plant species had the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, except rice, which had the ubiquitin promoter from maize. The reasons for the differences between species in the exudation from roots of the toxins are not known. The released toxins persisted in soil as the result of their binding on surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances), which reduced their biodegradation. The release of the toxins in root exudates could enhance the control of target insect pests, constitute a hazard to nontarget organisms, and/or increase the selection of toxin-resistant target insects.",
keywords = "Bacillus thuringiensis, Hydroponics, Insecticidal proteins, Root exudates, Soil, Surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances), Transgenic Bt plants",
author = "Deepak Saxena and Stewart, {C. Neal} and Illimar Altosaar and Qingyao Shu and G. Stotzky",
year = "2004",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.plaphy.2004.03.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "383--387",
journal = "Plant Physiology and Biochemistry",
issn = "0981-9428",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson SAS",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Larvicidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are released in root exudates of transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, potato, and rice but not of B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco

AU - Saxena, Deepak

AU - Stewart, C. Neal

AU - Altosaar, Illimar

AU - Shu, Qingyao

AU - Stotzky, G.

PY - 2004/5

Y1 - 2004/5

N2 - Larvicidal proteins encoded by cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis were released in root exudates from transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, rice, and potato but not from B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco. Nonsterile soil and sterile hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis corn, rice, or potato had been grown were immunologically positive for the presence of the Cry proteins; from B. thuringiensis corn and rice, the soil and solution were toxic to the larva of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta), and from potato, to the larva of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), representative lepidoptera and coleoptera, respectively. No toxin was detected immunologically or by larvicidal assay in soil or hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, or tobacco, as well as all near-isogenic non-B. thuringiensis plant counterparts or no plants, had been grown. All plant species had the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, except rice, which had the ubiquitin promoter from maize. The reasons for the differences between species in the exudation from roots of the toxins are not known. The released toxins persisted in soil as the result of their binding on surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances), which reduced their biodegradation. The release of the toxins in root exudates could enhance the control of target insect pests, constitute a hazard to nontarget organisms, and/or increase the selection of toxin-resistant target insects.

AB - Larvicidal proteins encoded by cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis were released in root exudates from transgenic B. thuringiensis corn, rice, and potato but not from B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, and tobacco. Nonsterile soil and sterile hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis corn, rice, or potato had been grown were immunologically positive for the presence of the Cry proteins; from B. thuringiensis corn and rice, the soil and solution were toxic to the larva of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta), and from potato, to the larva of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), representative lepidoptera and coleoptera, respectively. No toxin was detected immunologically or by larvicidal assay in soil or hydroponic solution in which B. thuringiensis canola, cotton, or tobacco, as well as all near-isogenic non-B. thuringiensis plant counterparts or no plants, had been grown. All plant species had the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, except rice, which had the ubiquitin promoter from maize. The reasons for the differences between species in the exudation from roots of the toxins are not known. The released toxins persisted in soil as the result of their binding on surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances), which reduced their biodegradation. The release of the toxins in root exudates could enhance the control of target insect pests, constitute a hazard to nontarget organisms, and/or increase the selection of toxin-resistant target insects.

KW - Bacillus thuringiensis

KW - Hydroponics

KW - Insecticidal proteins

KW - Root exudates

KW - Soil

KW - Surface-active particles (e.g. clay minerals, humic substances)

KW - Transgenic Bt plants

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3042527852&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3042527852&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.plaphy.2004.03.004

DO - 10.1016/j.plaphy.2004.03.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 15191740

AN - SCOPUS:3042527852

VL - 42

SP - 383

EP - 387

JO - Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

JF - Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

SN - 0981-9428

IS - 5

ER -