Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading

S. Brody, D. L. Wolitzky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This controlled study was designed to test the popular idea that ostensibly lowered blood sugar following excessive sugar intake adversely affects mood. Fifty-three normal subjects divided into 3 groups received respectively a sucrose solution, a saccharin solution, or water. Results from a self-reported mood scale, the serial sevens test for cognitive efficiency, and a self-report neuroticism scale, all administered before the solutions were taken and 20 min and 4 hr later, did not indicate that sugar ingestion noticeably affects mood more than ingestion of saccharin or water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume24
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Sucrose
Saccharin
Eating
Water
Self Report
Blood Glucose
Mood
Neuroticism
Controlled
Intake
Self-report
Blood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Brody, S., & Wolitzky, D. L. (1983). Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading. Psychosomatics, 24(2), 155-162.

Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading. / Brody, S.; Wolitzky, D. L.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 24, No. 2, 1983, p. 155-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brody, S & Wolitzky, DL 1983, 'Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading', Psychosomatics, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 155-162.
Brody S, Wolitzky DL. Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading. Psychosomatics. 1983;24(2):155-162.
Brody, S. ; Wolitzky, D. L. / Lack of mood changes following sucrose loading. In: Psychosomatics. 1983 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 155-162.
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