Labor Market Returns for Graduates of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

Toby J. Park, Stella M. Flores, Christopher J. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Latinos have become the largest minority group in American postsecondary education, a majority of whom attend two- or four-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). However, little is known about labor market outcomes as result of attending these institutions. Using a unique student-level administrative database in Texas, and accounting for college selectivity, we examine whether attending an HSI influences labor market outcomes ten years after high school graduation for Latino students in Texas. We find no difference in the earnings of Hispanic graduates from HSIs and non-HSIs. This analysis represents one of the first to examine the labor market outcomes for Latino students in this sector of education accounting for critical factors that include a student’s high school and community context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalResearch in Higher Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 8 2017

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labor market
graduate
student
school graduation
education
minority
school
community
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Keywords

  • Hispanic-serving institutions
  • HSIs
  • Labor market returns
  • Wage returns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Labor Market Returns for Graduates of Hispanic-Serving Institutions. / Park, Toby J.; Flores, Stella M.; Ryan, Christopher J.

In: Research in Higher Education, 08.05.2017, p. 1-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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