Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires

Eric Stern, James F. Klemic, David A. Routenberg, Pauline N. Wyrembak, Daniel B. Turner-Evans, Andrew Hamilton, David A. LaVan, Tarek M. Fahmy, Mark A. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Semiconducting nanowires have the potential to function as highly sensitive and selective sensors for the label-free detection of low concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms. Successful solution-phase nanowire sensing has been demonstrated for ions, small molecules, proteins, DNA and viruses; however, 'bottom-up' nanowires (or similarly configured carbon nanotubes) used for these demonstrations require hybrid fabrication schemes, which result in severe integration issues that have hindered widespread application. Alternative 'top-down' fabrication methods of nanowire-like devices produce disappointing performance because of process-induced material and device degradation. Here we report an approach that uses complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor compatible technology and hence demonstrate the specific label-free detection of below 100 femtomolar concentrations of antibodies as well as real-time monitoring of the cellular immune response. This approach eliminates the need for hybrid methods and enables system-scale integration of these sensors with signal processing and information systems. Additionally, the ability to monitor antibody binding and sense the cellular immune response in real time with readily available technology should facilitate widespread diagnostic applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-522
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume445
Issue number7127
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

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Nanowires
Semiconductors
Oxides
Metals
Cellular Immunity
Systems Integration
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Carbon Nanotubes
DNA Viruses
Antibodies
Information Systems
Ions
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Stern, E., Klemic, J. F., Routenberg, D. A., Wyrembak, P. N., Turner-Evans, D. B., Hamilton, A., ... Reed, M. A. (2007). Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires. Nature, 445(7127), 519-522. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05498

Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires. / Stern, Eric; Klemic, James F.; Routenberg, David A.; Wyrembak, Pauline N.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Hamilton, Andrew; LaVan, David A.; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Reed, Mark A.

In: Nature, Vol. 445, No. 7127, 01.02.2007, p. 519-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stern, E, Klemic, JF, Routenberg, DA, Wyrembak, PN, Turner-Evans, DB, Hamilton, A, LaVan, DA, Fahmy, TM & Reed, MA 2007, 'Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires', Nature, vol. 445, no. 7127, pp. 519-522. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05498
Stern E, Klemic JF, Routenberg DA, Wyrembak PN, Turner-Evans DB, Hamilton A et al. Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires. Nature. 2007 Feb 1;445(7127):519-522. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature05498
Stern, Eric ; Klemic, James F. ; Routenberg, David A. ; Wyrembak, Pauline N. ; Turner-Evans, Daniel B. ; Hamilton, Andrew ; LaVan, David A. ; Fahmy, Tarek M. ; Reed, Mark A. / Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires. In: Nature. 2007 ; Vol. 445, No. 7127. pp. 519-522.
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