Joint drug purchases and drug preparation risk behaviors among Puerto Rican injection drug users

Héctor M. Colón, H. Ann Finlinson, Rafaela R. Robles, Sherry Deren, Jonny Andía, Sung Yeon Kang, Denise Oliver-Vélez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the process of preparing jointly purchased drugs, injection drug users (IDUs) may share drug preparation materials and use a single syringe to distribute injectable drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the association of joint drug purchasing with drug preparation risk behaviors among Puerto Rican IDUs. The study sample comprised 555 IDUs from New York City and 297 from Puerto Rico. IDUs reported pooling money for 12% of the injection episodes in New York, and for 14% of the injection episodes in Puerto Rico. In both study sites, all correlation coefficients between frequency of pooling money and drug preparation behaviors were .30 or larger. After controlling for sociodemographics, drugs injected, and injection frequency, pooling money was significantly associated to all four drug preparation behaviors in both study sites. HIV prevention interventions need to be cognizant of the joint purchasing of drugs and its relationship to drug preparation risk behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-96
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2001

Keywords

  • HIV risk behaviors
  • Injection drug users
  • Puerto Rico
  • Shared drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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  • Cite this

    Colón, H. M., Finlinson, H. A., Robles, R. R., Deren, S., Andía, J., Kang, S. Y., & Oliver-Vélez, D. (2001). Joint drug purchases and drug preparation risk behaviors among Puerto Rican injection drug users. AIDS and Behavior, 5(1), 85-96. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009515723223