Jews and their intraethnic vulnerability to affective disorders, fact or artifact? II: Evidence from a cohort study

Robert Kohn, Itzhak Levav, Bruce R. Dohrenwend, Patrick Shrout, Andrew E. Skodol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper, which complements a prior review of published studies, reports findings from a community-based survey of 4,914 Israel-born offspring of immigrants from Europe (Ashkenazim) and North Africa. Respondents were examined by psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Israel version, and diagnosed with the Research Diagnostic Criteria. Unlike previous studies, this investigation found that Israelis of North African origin had significantly higher rates of affective disorders, including major depressive and intermittent depressive disorders. The Ashkenazim, however, had higher rates of bipolar I disorder at the definite level of diagnosis. Differential patterns in help-seeking may account for the divergent findings between this communitybased study and earlier treatment-based reports. These results suggest the need to further investigate social and genetic etiological factors that may explain the differential rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-156
Number of pages8
JournalIsrael Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences
Volume34
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Jews
Israel
Mood Disorders
Artifacts
Cohort Studies
Northern Africa
Depressive Disorder
Bipolar Disorder
Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Appointments and Schedules
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Jews and their intraethnic vulnerability to affective disorders, fact or artifact? II : Evidence from a cohort study. / Kohn, Robert; Levav, Itzhak; Dohrenwend, Bruce R.; Shrout, Patrick; Skodol, Andrew E.

In: Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 2, 1997, p. 149-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6214ec97876a4ff989a46711d8baf9d4,
title = "Jews and their intraethnic vulnerability to affective disorders, fact or artifact? II: Evidence from a cohort study",
abstract = "This paper, which complements a prior review of published studies, reports findings from a community-based survey of 4,914 Israel-born offspring of immigrants from Europe (Ashkenazim) and North Africa. Respondents were examined by psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Israel version, and diagnosed with the Research Diagnostic Criteria. Unlike previous studies, this investigation found that Israelis of North African origin had significantly higher rates of affective disorders, including major depressive and intermittent depressive disorders. The Ashkenazim, however, had higher rates of bipolar I disorder at the definite level of diagnosis. Differential patterns in help-seeking may account for the divergent findings between this communitybased study and earlier treatment-based reports. These results suggest the need to further investigate social and genetic etiological factors that may explain the differential rates.",
author = "Robert Kohn and Itzhak Levav and Dohrenwend, {Bruce R.} and Patrick Shrout and Skodol, {Andrew E.}",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "149--156",
journal = "Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences",
issn = "0333-7308",
publisher = "Mediafarm Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Jews and their intraethnic vulnerability to affective disorders, fact or artifact? II

T2 - Evidence from a cohort study

AU - Kohn, Robert

AU - Levav, Itzhak

AU - Dohrenwend, Bruce R.

AU - Shrout, Patrick

AU - Skodol, Andrew E.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - This paper, which complements a prior review of published studies, reports findings from a community-based survey of 4,914 Israel-born offspring of immigrants from Europe (Ashkenazim) and North Africa. Respondents were examined by psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Israel version, and diagnosed with the Research Diagnostic Criteria. Unlike previous studies, this investigation found that Israelis of North African origin had significantly higher rates of affective disorders, including major depressive and intermittent depressive disorders. The Ashkenazim, however, had higher rates of bipolar I disorder at the definite level of diagnosis. Differential patterns in help-seeking may account for the divergent findings between this communitybased study and earlier treatment-based reports. These results suggest the need to further investigate social and genetic etiological factors that may explain the differential rates.

AB - This paper, which complements a prior review of published studies, reports findings from a community-based survey of 4,914 Israel-born offspring of immigrants from Europe (Ashkenazim) and North Africa. Respondents were examined by psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Israel version, and diagnosed with the Research Diagnostic Criteria. Unlike previous studies, this investigation found that Israelis of North African origin had significantly higher rates of affective disorders, including major depressive and intermittent depressive disorders. The Ashkenazim, however, had higher rates of bipolar I disorder at the definite level of diagnosis. Differential patterns in help-seeking may account for the divergent findings between this communitybased study and earlier treatment-based reports. These results suggest the need to further investigate social and genetic etiological factors that may explain the differential rates.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030628817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030628817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 149

EP - 156

JO - Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences

JF - Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences

SN - 0333-7308

IS - 2

ER -