It is a painful somatic symptom, not the history of cancer/malignancy that is associated with depression: Findings from multiple national surveys

Krystina Johnson, Maria D. Politis, Andrew R. Hansen, Lindsey E. McKenzie, Dustin Duncan, Jian Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Medical case management has improved in the past few decades, changing the dynamic interaction between depression and prevalent medical diseases. It is relevant to describe the comorbidity between depression and medical diseases to further improve the effectiveness of case management. We analyzed the data of adults aged 20 years and older, who completed depression screening as a part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005 to 2012. Depression was ascertained using the Patient Health Questionnaire, a 9-item screening instrument asking about the frequency of depression symptoms over the past 2 weeks. Comorbid diseases were assessed in a self-reported personal interview on doctor-diagnosed health conditions. The associations between depression and medical diseases were limited to the diseases with painful somatic symptoms. Reported from 19.78% of men and 27.84% of women, arthritis was the most prevalent chronic disease, and was the only one consistently associated with depression. The odds ratio of moderate to severe depression was 1.65 (95% confidence interval = 1.12-2.44) for men and 2.11 (1.63-2.99) for women with arthritis compared with their counterparts free of arthritis. Moderate/severe depression was associated with a history of heart disease among men (2.45 [1.19-5.06]) and angina/angina pectoris among women (2.13 [1.07-4.26]). No associations were found between depression and cancer/malignancy, either among men or women. The potential impact of pain management on depression prevention among general population is substantial; more efforts are needed to assess chronic pain to facilitate timely prevention and treatment of depression and comorbid medical conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)740-746
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume158
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

History
Arthritis
Case Management
Neoplasms
Nutrition Surveys
Health
Angina Pectoris
Pain Management
Chronic Pain
Comorbidity
Heart Diseases
Chronic Disease
Odds Ratio
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Surveys and Questionnaires
Confidence Intervals
Interviews
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Depression
  • Heart diseases
  • National survey
  • Pain management
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

It is a painful somatic symptom, not the history of cancer/malignancy that is associated with depression : Findings from multiple national surveys. / Johnson, Krystina; Politis, Maria D.; Hansen, Andrew R.; McKenzie, Lindsey E.; Duncan, Dustin; Zhang, Jian.

In: Pain, Vol. 158, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 740-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Johnson, Krystina ; Politis, Maria D. ; Hansen, Andrew R. ; McKenzie, Lindsey E. ; Duncan, Dustin ; Zhang, Jian. / It is a painful somatic symptom, not the history of cancer/malignancy that is associated with depression : Findings from multiple national surveys. In: Pain. 2017 ; Vol. 158, No. 4. pp. 740-746.
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