Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca

Faisal Thayyullathil, Shahanas Chathoth, Abdulkader Hago, Ulli Wernery, Mahendra Patel, Sehamuddin Galadari

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    We have used a camel cell line model (Dubca) to investigate the effect of heat stress on cell survival. The mechanism(s) of such survival response are very important not only for normal physiological function, but also, in pathological conditions, such as cancer. Those cells that have escaped the normal response to heat are an important model in helping us better understand the intricate signaling change(s) that might have occurred in changing a cell's phenotype from normal to cancerous. Our findings in this study indicate that unlike comparative fibroblast cells (L929), Dubca cells are quite resistant and survive the 42°C heat stress in a time-dependent manner; indeed, the cells even show growth on par with those cells that are kept at the control temperature of 37°C. Expression levels of Akt, an important prosurvival kinase, are uniform, and irrespective of the experimental or control temperature, show basal control levels. In other words, there is no loss of Akt protein level following heat stress at 42°C. Similarly, no significant change in HSP70 expression level is observed. In contrast, the stress transcription factor c-Jun, and the stress activated kinase (Jnk) were induced during this heat-shock condition. This is in line with the fact that suppression of stress kinase Jnk renders cells thermoresistant. On the other hand, acquired tolerance to severe heat shock is associated with downregulation of Jnk.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationRecent Advances in Clinical Oncology
    PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
    Pages376-384
    Number of pages9
    ISBN (Print)9781573317009
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

    Publication series

    NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
    Volume1138
    ISSN (Print)0077-8923
    ISSN (Electronic)1749-6632

    Fingerprint

    Heat-Shock Response
    Camelus
    Fibroblasts
    Cells
    Hot Temperature
    Cell Line
    Phosphotransferases
    Temperature control
    Shock
    Level control
    Temperature
    Camel
    Heat
    Transcription Factors
    Cell Survival
    Down-Regulation
    Phenotype
    Growth
    Proteins

    Keywords

    • Akt
    • c-Jun
    • Camel fibroblast
    • Cell line Dubca
    • Heat stress
    • Heat-shock protein
    • Jnk

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • History and Philosophy of Science

    Cite this

    Thayyullathil, F., Chathoth, S., Hago, A., Wernery, U., Patel, M., & Galadari, S. (2008). Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca. In Recent Advances in Clinical Oncology (pp. 376-384). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1138). Blackwell Publishing Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.039

    Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca. / Thayyullathil, Faisal; Chathoth, Shahanas; Hago, Abdulkader; Wernery, Ulli; Patel, Mahendra; Galadari, Sehamuddin.

    Recent Advances in Clinical Oncology. Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2008. p. 376-384 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1138).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Thayyullathil, F, Chathoth, S, Hago, A, Wernery, U, Patel, M & Galadari, S 2008, Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca. in Recent Advances in Clinical Oncology. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1138, Blackwell Publishing Inc., pp. 376-384. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.039
    Thayyullathil F, Chathoth S, Hago A, Wernery U, Patel M, Galadari S. Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca. In Recent Advances in Clinical Oncology. Blackwell Publishing Inc. 2008. p. 376-384. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1414.039
    Thayyullathil, Faisal ; Chathoth, Shahanas ; Hago, Abdulkader ; Wernery, Ulli ; Patel, Mahendra ; Galadari, Sehamuddin. / Investigation of heat stress response in the camel fibroblast cell line Dubca. Recent Advances in Clinical Oncology. Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2008. pp. 376-384 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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