Investigating the option of installing small scale PVs on facility rooftops in a green supply chain

Tarek Abdallah, Ali Diabat, Jasper Rigter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Industry practitioners and policy makers are under increasing pressure to promote green supply chains through the integration of renewable energy sources. Changing facilities from net energy users to net energy producers is a major concern for supply chain managers who are interested in greening their business. Building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) is an innovative design idea to achieve energy positive buildings. In a BIPV building, photovoltaic (PV) arrays are integrated into the structure of the building in order to transform the incident solar radiation to clean energy that can be used in facility operations. This option is dependent on the economic attractiveness of the solar PVs, which, in return, depends on the policies (incentives, subsidies, feed-in tariff) in effect at the facility location, the efficiency of the PVs installed, and the amount of incident solar radiation at the facility location. We present an economic model that calculates the cost per kWh capacity of solar PVs installed and then integrate the decision of installing PVs of different sizes on the facility rooftops of a supply chain subject to the different environmental policies available. We study the implications of our model based on a sensitivity analysis for different carbon credit prices, PV generation costs, and feed-in tariff prices.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)465-477
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Journal of Production Economics
    Volume146
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

    Fingerprint

    Supply chains
    Incident solar radiation
    Economics
    Sensitivity analysis
    Costs
    Industry
    Managers
    Green supply chain
    Energy
    Carbon
    Integrated
    Tariffs
    Supply chain
    Facility location
    Incidents
    Radiation

    Keywords

    • Building-integrated photovoltaics
    • Carbon market
    • Emissions trading
    • Feed-in tariff
    • Green supply chain
    • Kyoto protocol
    • Net present value

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
    • Economics and Econometrics
    • Management Science and Operations Research
    • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    Cite this

    Investigating the option of installing small scale PVs on facility rooftops in a green supply chain. / Abdallah, Tarek; Diabat, Ali; Rigter, Jasper.

    In: International Journal of Production Economics, Vol. 146, No. 2, 01.12.2013, p. 465-477.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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