Introduction: The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Abstract

This chapter examines a hybrid, nomadic practice embodied primarily by people of color in the African diaspora. Known in some circles, particularly in New York, as "Yoruba reversionism", this practice is an active resigni-fication in Judith Butler's sense that has created a new context of legitimate speech and action as an insurrection against dominant authority. Diaspora performance provides a model that collapses binary distinctions between spectator and spectacle in which participants are at one and the same time both spectators and spectacles, and in which roles and positions of the participants are continually in flux. Practitioners value difference, or rather repetition with infinite distinction, rather than fixity in the performance. The performances construct nomadic subjectivities among participants within the spectacle itself in the give and take of the collaboration, where subject and object positions are in flux or collapse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDiaspora and Visual Culture
Subtitle of host publicationRepresenting Africans and Jews
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages1-18
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781136218743
ISBN (Print)0415166705, 9780415166690
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

spectator
diaspora
performance
people of color
subjectivity
Spectacle
Visual Culture
Values
Spectator
time
Authority
Fixity
Diaspora
African Diaspora
Embodied Practices
Insurrection
Judith Butler
Subjectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Mirzoeff, N. (2014). Introduction: The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures. In Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews (pp. 1-18). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315006161-8

Introduction : The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures. / Mirzoeff, Nicholas.

Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews. Taylor and Francis, 2014. p. 1-18.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Mirzoeff, N 2014, Introduction: The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures. in Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews. Taylor and Francis, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315006161-8
Mirzoeff N. Introduction: The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures. In Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews. Taylor and Francis. 2014. p. 1-18 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315006161-8
Mirzoeff, Nicholas. / Introduction : The multiple viewpoint: Diasporic visual cultures. Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews. Taylor and Francis, 2014. pp. 1-18
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