Intervention Effects of Information and Self-Regulation on Eating Fruits and Vegetables Over Two Years

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study tested whether an intervention that combined information with self-regulation strategies had a better effect on eating fruits and vegetables than an information-only intervention. Design: Women between age 30 and 50 (N = 255) participated in a 24-month randomized controlled trial comparing two brief interventions: All participants received the same information intervention; participants in the information plus self-regulation group additionally learned a self-regulation technique that integrates mental contrasting with implementation intentions. Main outcome measures: Participants reported in daily diaries how many servings of fruits and vegetables they ate per day during 1 week at baseline, and in the first week, 1, 2, 4, and 24 months after intervention. Results: Participants in both groups ate more fruits and vegetables (0.47 to 1.00 daily servings) than at baseline during the first 4 months after intervention. Two years later, participants in the information plus self-regulation group maintained the higher intake, whereas participants in the information group returned to baseline levels. Conclusion: Adding self-regulation training to an information intervention increased its effectiveness for long-term behavior change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)274-283
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Vegetables
Fruit
Eating
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Self-Control

Keywords

  • behavior change
  • fruits and vegetables
  • implementation intentions
  • mental contrasting
  • randomized controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Intervention Effects of Information and Self-Regulation on Eating Fruits and Vegetables Over Two Years. / Stadler, Gertraud; Oettingen, Gabriele; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 05.2010, p. 274-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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