Interrogating the intersections

How intersectional perspectives can inform developmental scholarship on critical consciousness

Erin Godfrey, Esther Burson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Developmental psychologists widely recognize that the social structures and inequities of American society influence youth development. A burgeoning body of research also considers how youth marginalized by society critically evaluate societal inequities and take action to change them (critical consciousness, Freire [Education for critical consciousness (Vol. 1). Bloomsbury Publishing.]), suggesting that marginalized youth who are more critically conscious experience improved mental health and better educational and occupational outcomes and are more engaged in traditional forms of civic behavior. The current manuscript critically reviews and extends this area of research from an intersectional perspective. Drawing from core writings in intersectionality and more recent psychological applications, we contend that research on marginalized youth’s critical consciousness could be further strengthened by (1) focusing on marginalizing systems, rather than marginalized individuals; (2) conceptualizing and examining multiple systems of oppression; and (3) paying greater attention to sociohistorical knowledge. We conclude with some initial concrete recommendations for integrating principles of intersectionality into scholarship on youths’ critical consciousness development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNew Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Volume2018
Issue number161
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Consciousness
Research
Psychology
Manuscripts
Mental Health
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{9cc728cfc5b64e578a5f7b1449da71f0,
title = "Interrogating the intersections: How intersectional perspectives can inform developmental scholarship on critical consciousness",
abstract = "Developmental psychologists widely recognize that the social structures and inequities of American society influence youth development. A burgeoning body of research also considers how youth marginalized by society critically evaluate societal inequities and take action to change them (critical consciousness, Freire [Education for critical consciousness (Vol. 1). Bloomsbury Publishing.]), suggesting that marginalized youth who are more critically conscious experience improved mental health and better educational and occupational outcomes and are more engaged in traditional forms of civic behavior. The current manuscript critically reviews and extends this area of research from an intersectional perspective. Drawing from core writings in intersectionality and more recent psychological applications, we contend that research on marginalized youth’s critical consciousness could be further strengthened by (1) focusing on marginalizing systems, rather than marginalized individuals; (2) conceptualizing and examining multiple systems of oppression; and (3) paying greater attention to sociohistorical knowledge. We conclude with some initial concrete recommendations for integrating principles of intersectionality into scholarship on youths’ critical consciousness development.",
author = "Erin Godfrey and Esther Burson",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/cad.20246",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2018",
journal = "New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development",
issn = "1520-3247",
publisher = "Jossey-Bass Inc.",
number = "161",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interrogating the intersections

T2 - How intersectional perspectives can inform developmental scholarship on critical consciousness

AU - Godfrey, Erin

AU - Burson, Esther

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Developmental psychologists widely recognize that the social structures and inequities of American society influence youth development. A burgeoning body of research also considers how youth marginalized by society critically evaluate societal inequities and take action to change them (critical consciousness, Freire [Education for critical consciousness (Vol. 1). Bloomsbury Publishing.]), suggesting that marginalized youth who are more critically conscious experience improved mental health and better educational and occupational outcomes and are more engaged in traditional forms of civic behavior. The current manuscript critically reviews and extends this area of research from an intersectional perspective. Drawing from core writings in intersectionality and more recent psychological applications, we contend that research on marginalized youth’s critical consciousness could be further strengthened by (1) focusing on marginalizing systems, rather than marginalized individuals; (2) conceptualizing and examining multiple systems of oppression; and (3) paying greater attention to sociohistorical knowledge. We conclude with some initial concrete recommendations for integrating principles of intersectionality into scholarship on youths’ critical consciousness development.

AB - Developmental psychologists widely recognize that the social structures and inequities of American society influence youth development. A burgeoning body of research also considers how youth marginalized by society critically evaluate societal inequities and take action to change them (critical consciousness, Freire [Education for critical consciousness (Vol. 1). Bloomsbury Publishing.]), suggesting that marginalized youth who are more critically conscious experience improved mental health and better educational and occupational outcomes and are more engaged in traditional forms of civic behavior. The current manuscript critically reviews and extends this area of research from an intersectional perspective. Drawing from core writings in intersectionality and more recent psychological applications, we contend that research on marginalized youth’s critical consciousness could be further strengthened by (1) focusing on marginalizing systems, rather than marginalized individuals; (2) conceptualizing and examining multiple systems of oppression; and (3) paying greater attention to sociohistorical knowledge. We conclude with some initial concrete recommendations for integrating principles of intersectionality into scholarship on youths’ critical consciousness development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054646429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054646429&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cad.20246

DO - 10.1002/cad.20246

M3 - Article

VL - 2018

JO - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

JF - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

SN - 1520-3247

IS - 161

ER -