International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES)

A Community-Based Comprehensive Services Model for Refugee Children in Resettlement

Dina Birman, Sarah Beehler, Emily Merrill Harris, Mary Lynn Everson, Karen Batia, Joan Liautaud, Stacy Frazier, Marc Atkins, Shanika Blanton, Johanna Buwalda, Louis Fogg, Elise Cappella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The development of evidence-based mental health interventions for refugees is complicated by the cultural and linguistic diversity of the participants, and the need to balance treatment of past traumatic experiences with ongoing support during the process of acculturation. In an effort to gather "practice-based evidence" from existing mental health services for refugees, a collaborative study of International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES), a comprehensive, community-based mental health program working with refugee children, was conducted to describe the program participants and service delivery model and to assess whether participants improved over time as a function of services. Results showed that participants improved, but that the improvement was not related to dosage of services. Implications of these findings for refugee mental health services are discussed and suggestions are made for future evaluation research of mental health services with refugees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-132
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

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Refugees
Mental Health Services
Mental Health
Cultural Diversity
Acculturation
Evidence-Based Practice
Linguistics
Resettlement
Enhancement
Health Services

Keywords

  • child mental health services
  • evidence-based practice
  • practice-based evidence
  • refugee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES) : A Community-Based Comprehensive Services Model for Refugee Children in Resettlement. / Birman, Dina; Beehler, Sarah; Harris, Emily Merrill; Everson, Mary Lynn; Batia, Karen; Liautaud, Joan; Frazier, Stacy; Atkins, Marc; Blanton, Shanika; Buwalda, Johanna; Fogg, Louis; Cappella, Elise.

In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 121-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Birman, D, Beehler, S, Harris, EM, Everson, ML, Batia, K, Liautaud, J, Frazier, S, Atkins, M, Blanton, S, Buwalda, J, Fogg, L & Cappella, E 2008, 'International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES): A Community-Based Comprehensive Services Model for Refugee Children in Resettlement', American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 121-132. https://doi.org/10.1037/0002-9432.78.1.121
Birman, Dina ; Beehler, Sarah ; Harris, Emily Merrill ; Everson, Mary Lynn ; Batia, Karen ; Liautaud, Joan ; Frazier, Stacy ; Atkins, Marc ; Blanton, Shanika ; Buwalda, Johanna ; Fogg, Louis ; Cappella, Elise. / International Family, Adult, and Child Enhancement Services (FACES) : A Community-Based Comprehensive Services Model for Refugee Children in Resettlement. In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 121-132.
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