Interactive DSP education using Java

Y. Cheneval, L. Balmelli, P. Prandoni, Jelena Kovacevic, M. Vetterli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We argue that Java is a natural language to develop interactive teaching material that can be shared and distributed widely. Unlike any other programming language or platform we know, Java development is justified because of its almost universal acceptance. We develop a block diagram (BD) based approach that allows one to develop interactive and downloadable signal processing laboratories. As an example, we show how specific experiments for a DSP class, as well as for an advanced course on wavelets have been developed. The article first explains why the Java language has been chosen, and then describes what has been realized today. Finally, we show how the BD representation can be efficiently used for the development of a wavelet theory course. It is shown that only a few simple blocks are sufficient for creating many didactic programs. This can be seen as an a posteriori justification of the BD model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998
Pages1905-1908
Number of pages4
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998
Event1998 23rd IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: May 12 1998May 15 1998

Other

Other1998 23rd IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period5/12/985/15/98

Fingerprint

Computer programming languages
Signal processing
Teaching
Education
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Signal Processing
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Cheneval, Y., Balmelli, L., Prandoni, P., Kovacevic, J., & Vetterli, M. (1998). Interactive DSP education using Java. In Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998 (Vol. 3, pp. 1905-1908). [681837] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837

Interactive DSP education using Java. / Cheneval, Y.; Balmelli, L.; Prandoni, P.; Kovacevic, Jelena; Vetterli, M.

Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998. Vol. 3 1998. p. 1905-1908 681837.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cheneval, Y, Balmelli, L, Prandoni, P, Kovacevic, J & Vetterli, M 1998, Interactive DSP education using Java. in Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998. vol. 3, 681837, pp. 1905-1908, 1998 23rd IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998, Seattle, WA, United States, 5/12/98. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837
Cheneval Y, Balmelli L, Prandoni P, Kovacevic J, Vetterli M. Interactive DSP education using Java. In Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998. Vol. 3. 1998. p. 1905-1908. 681837 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837
Cheneval, Y. ; Balmelli, L. ; Prandoni, P. ; Kovacevic, Jelena ; Vetterli, M. / Interactive DSP education using Java. Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998. Vol. 3 1998. pp. 1905-1908
@inproceedings{9e3c0ad803114bbca2d04ebd906e75ef,
title = "Interactive DSP education using Java",
abstract = "We argue that Java is a natural language to develop interactive teaching material that can be shared and distributed widely. Unlike any other programming language or platform we know, Java development is justified because of its almost universal acceptance. We develop a block diagram (BD) based approach that allows one to develop interactive and downloadable signal processing laboratories. As an example, we show how specific experiments for a DSP class, as well as for an advanced course on wavelets have been developed. The article first explains why the Java language has been chosen, and then describes what has been realized today. Finally, we show how the BD representation can be efficiently used for the development of a wavelet theory course. It is shown that only a few simple blocks are sufficient for creating many didactic programs. This can be seen as an a posteriori justification of the BD model.",
author = "Y. Cheneval and L. Balmelli and P. Prandoni and Jelena Kovacevic and M. Vetterli",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0780344286",
volume = "3",
pages = "1905--1908",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Interactive DSP education using Java

AU - Cheneval, Y.

AU - Balmelli, L.

AU - Prandoni, P.

AU - Kovacevic, Jelena

AU - Vetterli, M.

PY - 1998/12/1

Y1 - 1998/12/1

N2 - We argue that Java is a natural language to develop interactive teaching material that can be shared and distributed widely. Unlike any other programming language or platform we know, Java development is justified because of its almost universal acceptance. We develop a block diagram (BD) based approach that allows one to develop interactive and downloadable signal processing laboratories. As an example, we show how specific experiments for a DSP class, as well as for an advanced course on wavelets have been developed. The article first explains why the Java language has been chosen, and then describes what has been realized today. Finally, we show how the BD representation can be efficiently used for the development of a wavelet theory course. It is shown that only a few simple blocks are sufficient for creating many didactic programs. This can be seen as an a posteriori justification of the BD model.

AB - We argue that Java is a natural language to develop interactive teaching material that can be shared and distributed widely. Unlike any other programming language or platform we know, Java development is justified because of its almost universal acceptance. We develop a block diagram (BD) based approach that allows one to develop interactive and downloadable signal processing laboratories. As an example, we show how specific experiments for a DSP class, as well as for an advanced course on wavelets have been developed. The article first explains why the Java language has been chosen, and then describes what has been realized today. Finally, we show how the BD representation can be efficiently used for the development of a wavelet theory course. It is shown that only a few simple blocks are sufficient for creating many didactic programs. This can be seen as an a posteriori justification of the BD model.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031639914&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031639914&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837

DO - 10.1109/ICASSP.1998.681837

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:0031639914

SN - 0780344286

SN - 9780780344280

VL - 3

SP - 1905

EP - 1908

BT - Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, ICASSP 1998

ER -