Innovation under federal health care reform

J. E. Sisk, Sharon Glied

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Health care reform, which seeks to expand coverage and control spending, contains mixed messages for innovators. Policies that advance reform goals are likely to shift resources away from hospitals, specialists, and expensive procedures and toward areas such as prevention and primary care where innovation may yield greater health improvements per dollar spent. The size of these effects depends critically on the extent of cost containment achieved. Constraining spending will be politically difficult because it requires that consumers forgo some possible health benefits in return for lower costs. In a climate of cost containment, systematic evaluation of new technology is vital to identify and expand coverage to worthwhile innovations and to assure a fair hearing for innovators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-97
Number of pages16
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Health Care Reform
cost containment
innovator
Cost Control
coverage
health care
innovation
reform
Insurance Benefits
health
Climate
dollar
Hearing
new technology
Primary Health Care
climate
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Innovation under federal health care reform. / Sisk, J. E.; Glied, Sharon.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 13, No. 3, 1994, p. 82-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sisk, J. E. ; Glied, Sharon. / Innovation under federal health care reform. In: Health Affairs. 1994 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 82-97.
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