Initial evidence on the long-term impacts of work colleges

Gregory C. Wolniak, Ernest T. Pascarella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the purpose of gaining a better understanding of the impacts that attending a work college may have on students while in college and up to 25 years later, this study estimated the effects of graduating from a group of work colleges on alumni educational and employment outcomes. Based on an overall sample of 7083 alumni from 5 work colleges, 20 private liberal arts colleges, and 5 public regional universities, a series of regression equations tested for differences across a range of college and employment related outcomes. With respect to a variety of facets of undergraduate educational outcomes, results indicate that attending a work college, relative to other types of institutions, has significant long-term effects. With respect to socioeconomic outcomes, results indicate that work colleges provide the greatest benefit to students from families with relatively low parental incomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-71
Number of pages33
JournalResearch in Higher Education
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

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Keywords

  • Between-college effects
  • College impacts
  • Work

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Initial evidence on the long-term impacts of work colleges. / Wolniak, Gregory C.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

In: Research in Higher Education, Vol. 48, No. 1, 02.2007, p. 39-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolniak, Gregory C. ; Pascarella, Ernest T. / Initial evidence on the long-term impacts of work colleges. In: Research in Higher Education. 2007 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 39-71.
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