Information flow in animal-robot interactions

Sachit Butail, Fabrizio Ladu, Davide Spinello, Maurizio Porfiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The nonverbal transmission of information between social animals is a primary driving force behind their actions and, therefore, an important quantity to measure in animal behavior studies. Despite its key role in social behavior, the flow of information has only been inferred by correlating the actions of individuals with a simplifying assumption of linearity. In this paper, we leverage information-theoretic tools to relax this assumption. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we focus on a robotics-based experimental paradigm, which affords consistent and controllable delivery of visual stimuli to zebrafish. Specifically, we use a robotic arm to maneuver a life-sized replica of a zebrafish in a predetermined trajectory as it interacts with a focal subject in a test tank. We track the fish and the replica through time and use the resulting trajectory data to measure the transfer entropy between the replica and the focal subject, which, in turn, is used to quantify one-directional information flow from the robot to the fish. In agreement with our expectations, we find that the information flow from the replica to the zebrafish is significantly more than the other way around. Notably, such information is specifically related to the response of the fish to the replica, whereby we observe that the information flow is reduced significantly if the motion of the replica is randomly delayed in a surrogate dataset. In addition, comparison with a control experiment, where the replica is replaced by a conspecific, shows that the information flow toward the focal fish is significantly more for a robotic than a live stimulus. These findings support the reliability of using transfer entropy as a measure of information flow, while providing indirect evidence for the efficacy of a robotics-based platform in animal behavioral studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1315-1330
Number of pages16
JournalEntropy
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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information flow
robots
replicas
animals
fishes
robotics
interactions
visual stimuli
trajectories
entropy
robot arms
maneuvers
stimuli
linearity
delivery
platforms

Keywords

  • Entropy
  • Information flow
  • Robotics
  • Social behavior
  • Zebrafish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Information flow in animal-robot interactions. / Butail, Sachit; Ladu, Fabrizio; Spinello, Davide; Porfiri, Maurizio.

In: Entropy, Vol. 16, No. 3, 2014, p. 1315-1330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Butail, S, Ladu, F, Spinello, D & Porfiri, M 2014, 'Information flow in animal-robot interactions', Entropy, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 1315-1330. https://doi.org/10.3390/e16031315
Butail, Sachit ; Ladu, Fabrizio ; Spinello, Davide ; Porfiri, Maurizio. / Information flow in animal-robot interactions. In: Entropy. 2014 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 1315-1330.
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