Influence of diet on cardiovascular disease in African Americans, Africans, and African Caribbeans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Populations of African ancestry have differing dietary patterns and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and cannot be considered a homogeneous group. However, CVD risk is increasing worldwide, and more efforts must address the prevention and treatment of CVD in these populations. Diet is an important part of preventing and treating CVD, but few interventions have investigated diet and CVD in people of African ancestry. Most diet or CVD interventions involving these populations have occurred in the United States and a few in African countries. None were found in Caribbean countries. The interventions have shown that reducing sodium and fat intake and increasing fruit and vegetable intake can improve CVD risk markers. However, more investigation is needed to further elucidate the benefits of diet on CVD and determine the best methods for achieving sustainable dietary behavior change in people of African ancestry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-186
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Cardiovascular Risk Reports
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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African Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Diet
Population
Vegetables
Fruit
Sodium
Fats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

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abstract = "Populations of African ancestry have differing dietary patterns and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and cannot be considered a homogeneous group. However, CVD risk is increasing worldwide, and more efforts must address the prevention and treatment of CVD in these populations. Diet is an important part of preventing and treating CVD, but few interventions have investigated diet and CVD in people of African ancestry. Most diet or CVD interventions involving these populations have occurred in the United States and a few in African countries. None were found in Caribbean countries. The interventions have shown that reducing sodium and fat intake and increasing fruit and vegetable intake can improve CVD risk markers. However, more investigation is needed to further elucidate the benefits of diet on CVD and determine the best methods for achieving sustainable dietary behavior change in people of African ancestry.",
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