Inferences about competing measures based on patterns of binary significance tests are questionable

Patrick Shrout, Marika Yip-Bannicq

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An important step in demonstrating the validity of a new measure is to show that it is a better predictor of outcomes than existing measures-often called incremental validity. Investigators can use regression methods to argue for the incremental validity of new measures, while adjusting for competing or existing measures. The argument is often based on patterns of binary significance tests (BST): (a) both measures are significantly related to the outcome, (b) when adjusted for the new measure the competing measure is no longer significantly related to the outcome, but

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Methods
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 12 2016

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Research Personnel
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Social interaction
  • Statistical inference
  • Test validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Inferences about competing measures based on patterns of binary significance tests are questionable. / Shrout, Patrick; Yip-Bannicq, Marika.

In: Psychological Methods, 12.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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