Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior

Marjorie Rhodes, Chelsea Hetherington, Kimberly Brink, Henry M. Wellman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The experiences of social partners are important motivators of social action. Can infants use such experiences to make predictions about how social agents will behave? Sixteen-month-old infants were introduced to two social pairs. Initial events established within-pair cooperation as well as between-pair conflict involving an individual from each pair. Following these events, infants looked longer when between-pair members who had never previously interacted now cooperated - instead of conflicted - with each other. Thus, infants tracked the third-person allegiances and inferred that the conflict would generalize across social partnerships. These findings demonstrate a critical feature of early social cognition and promote needed, further research on the role of social allegiances in social cognition across development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-916
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Science
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cognition
Research
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior. / Rhodes, Marjorie; Hetherington, Chelsea; Brink, Kimberly; Wellman, Henry M.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 909-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhodes, M, Hetherington, C, Brink, K & Wellman, HM 2015, 'Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior', Developmental Science, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 909-916. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12267
Rhodes, Marjorie ; Hetherington, Chelsea ; Brink, Kimberly ; Wellman, Henry M. / Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior. In: Developmental Science. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 909-916.
@article{0103c9824549475f899bb0ac10c25f31,
title = "Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior",
abstract = "The experiences of social partners are important motivators of social action. Can infants use such experiences to make predictions about how social agents will behave? Sixteen-month-old infants were introduced to two social pairs. Initial events established within-pair cooperation as well as between-pair conflict involving an individual from each pair. Following these events, infants looked longer when between-pair members who had never previously interacted now cooperated - instead of conflicted - with each other. Thus, infants tracked the third-person allegiances and inferred that the conflict would generalize across social partnerships. These findings demonstrate a critical feature of early social cognition and promote needed, further research on the role of social allegiances in social cognition across development.",
author = "Marjorie Rhodes and Chelsea Hetherington and Kimberly Brink and Wellman, {Henry M.}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/desc.12267",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "909--916",
journal = "Developmental Science",
issn = "1363-755X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infants' use of social partnerships to predict behavior

AU - Rhodes, Marjorie

AU - Hetherington, Chelsea

AU - Brink, Kimberly

AU - Wellman, Henry M.

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - The experiences of social partners are important motivators of social action. Can infants use such experiences to make predictions about how social agents will behave? Sixteen-month-old infants were introduced to two social pairs. Initial events established within-pair cooperation as well as between-pair conflict involving an individual from each pair. Following these events, infants looked longer when between-pair members who had never previously interacted now cooperated - instead of conflicted - with each other. Thus, infants tracked the third-person allegiances and inferred that the conflict would generalize across social partnerships. These findings demonstrate a critical feature of early social cognition and promote needed, further research on the role of social allegiances in social cognition across development.

AB - The experiences of social partners are important motivators of social action. Can infants use such experiences to make predictions about how social agents will behave? Sixteen-month-old infants were introduced to two social pairs. Initial events established within-pair cooperation as well as between-pair conflict involving an individual from each pair. Following these events, infants looked longer when between-pair members who had never previously interacted now cooperated - instead of conflicted - with each other. Thus, infants tracked the third-person allegiances and inferred that the conflict would generalize across social partnerships. These findings demonstrate a critical feature of early social cognition and promote needed, further research on the role of social allegiances in social cognition across development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943603863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84943603863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/desc.12267

DO - 10.1111/desc.12267

M3 - Article

C2 - 25441335

AN - SCOPUS:84943603863

VL - 18

SP - 909

EP - 916

JO - Developmental Science

JF - Developmental Science

SN - 1363-755X

IS - 6

ER -