Infant mortality and income in 4 world cities

New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo

Victor G. Rodwin, Leland G. Neuberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We investigated the association between average income or deprivation and infant mortality rate across neighborhoods of 4 world cities. Methods. Using a maximum likelihood negative binomial regression model that controls for births, we analyzed data for 1988-1992 and 1993-1997. Results. In Manhattan, for both periods, we found an association (.05% significance level) between income and infant mortality. In Tokyo, for both periods, and in Paris and London for period 1, we found none (5% significance level). For period 2, the association just missed statistical significance for Paris, whereas for London it was significant (5% level). Conclusions. In stark contrast to Tokyo, Paris, and London, the association of income and infant mortality rate was strongly evident in Manhattan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-90
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

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Tokyo
Infant Mortality
Paris
Mortality
Statistical Models
Contraception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Infant mortality and income in 4 world cities : New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo. / Rodwin, Victor G.; Neuberg, Leland G.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 95, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 86-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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