Individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics associated with support of in-pharmacy vaccination among ESAP-registered pharmacies: Pharmacists role in reducing racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccinations in New York city

Natalie D. Crawford, Shannon Blaney, Silvia Amesty, Alexis V. Rivera, Alezandria K. Turner, Danielle C. Ompad, Crystal M. Fuller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

New York State (NYS) passed legislation authorizing pharmacists to administer immunizations in 2008. Racial/socioeconomic disparities persist in vaccination rates and vaccine-preventable diseases such as influenza. Many NYS pharmacies participate in the Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP), which allows provision of non-prescription syringes to help prevent transmission of HIV, and are uniquely positioned to offer vaccination services to low-income communities. To understand individual and neighborhood characteristics of pharmacy staff support for in-pharmacy vaccination, we combined census tract data with baseline pharmacy data from the Pharmacies as Resources Making Links to Community Services (PHARM-Link) study among ESAP-registered pharmacies. The sample consists of 437 pharmacists, non-pharmacist owners, and technicians enrolled from 103 eligible New York City pharmacies. Using multilevel analysis, pharmacy staff who expressed support of in-pharmacy vaccination services were 69% more likely to support in-pharmacy HIV testing services (OR, 1.69; 95% CI 1.39-2.04). While pharmacy staff who worked in neighborhoods with a high percent of minority residents were less likely to express support of in-pharmacy vaccination, those in neighborhoods with a high percent of foreign-born residents were marginally more likely to express support of in-pharmacy vaccination. While educational campaigns around the importance of vaccination access may be needed among some pharmacy staff and minority community residents, we have provided evidence supporting scale-up of vaccination efforts in pharmacies located in foreign-born/immigrant communities which has potential to reduce disparities in vaccination rates and preventable influenza-related mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-185
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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Pharmacies
Syringes
pharmacist
vaccination
Pharmacists
Human Influenza
contagious disease
Vaccination
staff
HIV
Multilevel Analysis
resident
Pharmaceutical Services
Social Welfare
Censuses
Legislation
minority
Immunization
community
Vaccines

Keywords

  • Pharmacy services
  • Pharmacy staff support
  • Racial/ethnic disparities
  • Vaccination access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics associated with support of in-pharmacy vaccination among ESAP-registered pharmacies : Pharmacists role in reducing racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccinations in New York city. / Crawford, Natalie D.; Blaney, Shannon; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Turner, Alezandria K.; Ompad, Danielle C.; Fuller, Crystal M.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 88, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 176-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "New York State (NYS) passed legislation authorizing pharmacists to administer immunizations in 2008. Racial/socioeconomic disparities persist in vaccination rates and vaccine-preventable diseases such as influenza. Many NYS pharmacies participate in the Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP), which allows provision of non-prescription syringes to help prevent transmission of HIV, and are uniquely positioned to offer vaccination services to low-income communities. To understand individual and neighborhood characteristics of pharmacy staff support for in-pharmacy vaccination, we combined census tract data with baseline pharmacy data from the Pharmacies as Resources Making Links to Community Services (PHARM-Link) study among ESAP-registered pharmacies. The sample consists of 437 pharmacists, non-pharmacist owners, and technicians enrolled from 103 eligible New York City pharmacies. Using multilevel analysis, pharmacy staff who expressed support of in-pharmacy vaccination services were 69{\%} more likely to support in-pharmacy HIV testing services (OR, 1.69; 95{\%} CI 1.39-2.04). While pharmacy staff who worked in neighborhoods with a high percent of minority residents were less likely to express support of in-pharmacy vaccination, those in neighborhoods with a high percent of foreign-born residents were marginally more likely to express support of in-pharmacy vaccination. While educational campaigns around the importance of vaccination access may be needed among some pharmacy staff and minority community residents, we have provided evidence supporting scale-up of vaccination efforts in pharmacies located in foreign-born/immigrant communities which has potential to reduce disparities in vaccination rates and preventable influenza-related mortality.",
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