Increasing prevalence of electronic cigarette use among smokers hospitalized in 5 US cities, 2010-2013

Nancy A. Rigotti, Kathleen F. Harrington, Kimber Richter, Jeffrey L. Fellows, Scott Sherman, Ellie Grossman, Yuchiao Chang, Hilary A. Tindle, Thomas Ylioja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Little is known about the pattern of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use over time or among smokers with medical comorbidity. Methods: We assessed current cigarette smokers' use of e-cigarettes during the 30 days before admission to 9 hospitals in 5 geographically dispersed US cities: Birmingham, AL; Boston, MA; Kansas City, KS; New York, NY; and Portland, OR. Each hospital was conducting a randomized controlled trial as part of the NIH-sponsored Consortium of Hospitals Advancing Research on Tobacco (CHART). We conducted a pooled analysis using multiple logistic regression to examine changes in e-cigarette use over time and to identify correlates of e-cigarette use. Results: Among 4,660 smokers hospitalized between July 2010 and December 2013 (mean age 57 years, 57% male, 71% white, 56% some college, average 14 cigarettes/day), 14% reported using an e-cigarette during the 30 days before admission. The prevalence of e-cigarette use increased from 1.1% in 2010 to 10.3% in 2011, 10.2% in 2012, and 18.4% in 2013; the increase was statistically significant (p < .0001) after adjustment for age, sex, education, and CHART study. Younger, better educated, and heavier smokers were more likely to use e-cigarettes. Smokers who were Hispanic, non-Hispanic black, and who had Medicaid or no insurance were less likely to use e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use also varied by CHART project and by geographic region. Conclusions: E-cigarette use increased substantially from 2010 to 2013 among a large sample of hospitalized adult cigarette smokers. E-cigarette use was more common among heavier smokers and among those who were younger, white, and who had higher socioeconomic status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-244
Number of pages9
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Tobacco Products
Tobacco
Research
Sex Education
Electronic Cigarettes
Medicaid
Insurance
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
Comorbidity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rigotti, N. A., Harrington, K. F., Richter, K., Fellows, J. L., Sherman, S., Grossman, E., ... Ylioja, T. (2015). Increasing prevalence of electronic cigarette use among smokers hospitalized in 5 US cities, 2010-2013. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 17(2), 236-244. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu138

Increasing prevalence of electronic cigarette use among smokers hospitalized in 5 US cities, 2010-2013. / Rigotti, Nancy A.; Harrington, Kathleen F.; Richter, Kimber; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Sherman, Scott; Grossman, Ellie; Chang, Yuchiao; Tindle, Hilary A.; Ylioja, Thomas.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 236-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rigotti, NA, Harrington, KF, Richter, K, Fellows, JL, Sherman, S, Grossman, E, Chang, Y, Tindle, HA & Ylioja, T 2015, 'Increasing prevalence of electronic cigarette use among smokers hospitalized in 5 US cities, 2010-2013', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 236-244. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu138
Rigotti, Nancy A. ; Harrington, Kathleen F. ; Richter, Kimber ; Fellows, Jeffrey L. ; Sherman, Scott ; Grossman, Ellie ; Chang, Yuchiao ; Tindle, Hilary A. ; Ylioja, Thomas. / Increasing prevalence of electronic cigarette use among smokers hospitalized in 5 US cities, 2010-2013. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 236-244.
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