Increased drug use among old-for-grade adolescents

Robert S. Byrd, Michael Weitzman, Andrew S. Doniger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective: To determine whether students older than most other students at their grade level ('old for grade') are more likely to report engaging in alcohol, tobacco, and drug-related behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional analyses of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Setting: Monroe County, New York. Participants: A total of 1396 high school students from selected classrooms; 68 classrooms randomly selected within schools with the number of students per school proportionally selected from the 28 schools in the county. Main Outcome Measure: Rates of drug-related behaviors by age-for-grade status. Results: Thirty-six percent of adolescents surveyed were old for grade. Adjusting for multiple potential con founders, old-for-grade high school students were more likely to report being regular smokers, chewing tobacco, drinking alcoholic beverages, driving in a car with someone who had been drinking, using alcohol or other drugs before last sexual intercourse, using cocaine in the past month, ever using crack, and using injected or other illicit drugs. Conclusions: Old-for-grade status is a potentially important marker for drug-related behaviors in adolescents. The antecedents of adolescent risk-taking behavior may begin before the teen years, and prevention of school failure or interventions targeted toward old-for-grade children could affect their propensity to experiment with or use drugs during adolescence.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)470-476
    Number of pages7
    JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
    Volume150
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

    Fingerprint

    Students
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Risk-Taking
    Smokeless Tobacco
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Adolescent Behavior
    Coitus
    Street Drugs
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
    Cocaine
    Alcohol Drinking
    Drinking
    Tobacco
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Alcohols
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

    Cite this

    Increased drug use among old-for-grade adolescents. / Byrd, Robert S.; Weitzman, Michael; Doniger, Andrew S.

    In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 150, No. 5, 01.01.1996, p. 470-476.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Byrd, Robert S. ; Weitzman, Michael ; Doniger, Andrew S. / Increased drug use among old-for-grade adolescents. In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 150, No. 5. pp. 470-476.
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