Incidence and prevalence of hepatitis c virus infection among persons who inject drugs in New York City

2006-2013

Ashly E. Jordan, Don Des Jarlais, Kamyar Arasteh, Courtney Mcknight, Denis Nash, David C. Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C virus infection is a source of significant preventable morbidity and mortality among persons who inject drugs (PWID). We sought to assess trends in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among PWID from 2006 to 2013 in New York City (NYC). Methods: Annual cross-sectional surveys of PWID entering a large drug abuse treatment program were performed. Risk behavior questionnaires were administered, and HIV and HCV testing were conducted. Comparisons were made with prior prevalence and incidence estimates in 1990-1991 and 2000-2001 reflecting different periods of combined prevention and treatment efforts. Results: HCV prevalence among PWID (N: 1535) was 67% (95% CI: 66-70%) during the study period, and was not significantly different from that observed in 2000-2001. The estimated HCV incidence among new injectors (persons injecting for ≤6 years) during 2006-2013 was 19.5/100 PYO (95% CI: 17-23) and did not differ from that observed in 2000-2001 (18/100 PYO, 95% CI: 14-23/100). Conclusions: Despite the expansion of combined prevention programming between 2000-2001 and 2006-2013, HCV prevalence remained high. Estimated HCV incidence among new injectors also remained high, and not significantly lower than in 2000-2001, indicating that expanded combined prevention efforts are needed to control the HCV epidemic among PWID in NYC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-200
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume152
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Hepatitis Viruses
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Hepacivirus
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug therapy
Risk-Taking
Substance-Related Disorders
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV
Morbidity
Mortality
Testing

Keywords

  • Hepatitis C virus infection
  • Medication assisted treatment
  • Methadone maintenance treatment
  • Needle/syringe exchange program
  • People who inject drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Incidence and prevalence of hepatitis c virus infection among persons who inject drugs in New York City : 2006-2013. / Jordan, Ashly E.; Des Jarlais, Don; Arasteh, Kamyar; Mcknight, Courtney; Nash, Denis; Perlman, David C.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 152, 01.07.2015, p. 194-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Perlman, David C.

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