In vitro tendon cell growth rates on a synthetic fiber scaffold material and on standard culture plates

John Ricci, A. G. Gona, H. Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Growth rates of rat tendon fibroblasts cultured in a three-dimensional carbon fiber matrix were compared with those of cells cultured on standard flat culture plates. The carbon fiber has been used as a tissue scaffold for tendon and ligament repair in animal and clinical studies. While cell growth on the culture plates appears to follow a growth curve containing a lag phase, a log phase, and plateau phase of growth, cell growth in the fiber matrix was characterized by a suppressed log phase of growth. The results suggest fundamental differences in the mechanisms controlling cell growth on planar vs. three-dimensional fiber substrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-666
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume25
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1991

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Synthetic fibers
Tendons
Cell growth
Scaffolds (biology)
Cell culture
Carbon fibers
Tissue Scaffolds
Fibers
Ligaments
Fibroblasts
Rats
Animals
Repair
Substrates
carbon fiber

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

In vitro tendon cell growth rates on a synthetic fiber scaffold material and on standard culture plates. / Ricci, John; Gona, A. G.; Alexander, H.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 25, No. 5, 05.1991, p. 651-666.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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