In-services and empty threats

The roles of organizational practices and workplace experiences in shaping U.S. educators' understandings of students' rights

Jason Thompson, Richard Arum, Lauren B. Edelman, Calvin Morrill, Karolyn Tyson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper applies theoretical frameworks from organizational sociology and sociolegal studies to examine factors associated with educators' conceptions of students' rights to due process in disciplinary actions. We analyze a unique representative data set of 402 teachers and 200 administrators in U.S. high schools to investigate how educators understand the rights to due process articulated in the Supreme Court case of Goss v. Lopez (1975). We then examine whether individual characteristics and participation in organizational processes are associated with educators' understandings of students' due process rights. Findings suggest that educators' understandings of students' entitlements to due process vary with educators' level of education, experience of school-related legal threats, and participation in district or diocese in-service training programs on students' rights. Results point to organizational climate as a key factor in shaping educators' rights conceptions and the role of law in American schools.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)391-402
    Number of pages12
    JournalSocial Science Research
    Volume53
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

    Fingerprint

    workplace
    educator
    threat
    experience
    student
    organizational sociology
    school
    diocese
    participation
    level of education
    Supreme Court
    training program
    climate
    district
    Law
    teacher

    Keywords

    • Due process
    • In-service training
    • Rights understandings
    • School law
    • Student rights

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    In-services and empty threats : The roles of organizational practices and workplace experiences in shaping U.S. educators' understandings of students' rights. / Thompson, Jason; Arum, Richard; Edelman, Lauren B.; Morrill, Calvin; Tyson, Karolyn.

    In: Social Science Research, Vol. 53, 01.09.2015, p. 391-402.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Thompson, Jason ; Arum, Richard ; Edelman, Lauren B. ; Morrill, Calvin ; Tyson, Karolyn. / In-services and empty threats : The roles of organizational practices and workplace experiences in shaping U.S. educators' understandings of students' rights. In: Social Science Research. 2015 ; Vol. 53. pp. 391-402.
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