Improving patient knowledge of discharge medications in an oncology setting

Donna L. Berry, Terri Cunningham, Seth Eisenberg, Mihkaila Wickline, Marilyn Hammer, Carolina Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Discharge medications for a patient with cancer typically are numerous and complex. During the transition between inpatient stays and ambulatory follow-up visits, patients commonly misunderstand medication instructions, placing them at risk for under- or overdosing. This column discusses the results of an evidence-based practice change project at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance to improve adult patient knowledge and use of discharge medications. Ensuring patient receipt of written discharge medication instructions and checking in with patients after discharge may be an approach to maximize the safety of self-administered medication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-37
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Patient Discharge
Evidence-Based Practice
Inpatients
Neoplasms
Safety

Keywords

  • discharge planning
  • medication adherence
  • patient education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Improving patient knowledge of discharge medications in an oncology setting. / Berry, Donna L.; Cunningham, Terri; Eisenberg, Seth; Wickline, Mihkaila; Hammer, Marilyn; Berg, Carolina.

In: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 35-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berry, Donna L. ; Cunningham, Terri ; Eisenberg, Seth ; Wickline, Mihkaila ; Hammer, Marilyn ; Berg, Carolina. / Improving patient knowledge of discharge medications in an oncology setting. In: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 35-37.
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