Implementation of Online Opioid Prevention, Recognition and Response Trainings for Laypeople: Year 1 Survey Results

Janie Simmons, Sonali Rajan, Lloyd Goldsamt, Luther Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This article reports on the first implementation of an online opioid-overdose prevention, recognition and response training for laypeople. The training was disseminated nationally in November 2014. Between 2000 and 2014, U.S. opioid deaths increased by 200%. The importance of complementary approaches to reduce opioid overdose deaths, such as online training, cannot be overstated. Objectives: A retrospective evaluation was conducted to assess perceived knowledge, skills to intervene in an overdose, confidence to intervene, and satisfaction with the training. Measurements: Descriptive statistics were used to report sample characteristics, compare experiences with overdose and/or naloxone between subgroups, and describe participants’ satisfaction with the trainings. Z-ratios were used to compare independent proportions, and paired t-tests were used to compare participant responses to items pre- and posttraining, including perceived confidence to intervene and perceived knowledge and skills to intervene successfully. Results: Between January and October 2015, 2,450 laypeople took the online training; 1,464 (59.8%) agreed to be contacted. Of these, 311 (21.2% of those contacted) completed the survey. Over 80% reported high satisfaction with content, format and mode of delivery and high satisfaction with items related to confidence and overdose reversal preparedness. Notably, 89.0% of participants felt they had the knowledge and skills to intervene successfully posttraining compared to 20.3% pretraining (z = −17.2, p <.001). Similarly, posttraining, 87.8% of participants felt confident they could successfully intervene compared to 24.4% pretraining (z = −15.9, p <.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the GetNaloxoneNow.org online training for laypeople.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 11 2018

Fingerprint

layperson
Opioid Analgesics
confidence
Naloxone
death
descriptive statistics
Surveys and Questionnaires
evaluation

Keywords

  • bystanders
  • Heroin overdose
  • naloxone
  • online education
  • opioid overdose
  • overdose prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Implementation of Online Opioid Prevention, Recognition and Response Trainings for Laypeople : Year 1 Survey Results. / Simmons, Janie; Rajan, Sonali; Goldsamt, Lloyd; Elliott, Luther.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, 11.04.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: This article reports on the first implementation of an online opioid-overdose prevention, recognition and response training for laypeople. The training was disseminated nationally in November 2014. Between 2000 and 2014, U.S. opioid deaths increased by 200{\%}. The importance of complementary approaches to reduce opioid overdose deaths, such as online training, cannot be overstated. Objectives: A retrospective evaluation was conducted to assess perceived knowledge, skills to intervene in an overdose, confidence to intervene, and satisfaction with the training. Measurements: Descriptive statistics were used to report sample characteristics, compare experiences with overdose and/or naloxone between subgroups, and describe participants’ satisfaction with the trainings. Z-ratios were used to compare independent proportions, and paired t-tests were used to compare participant responses to items pre- and posttraining, including perceived confidence to intervene and perceived knowledge and skills to intervene successfully. Results: Between January and October 2015, 2,450 laypeople took the online training; 1,464 (59.8{\%}) agreed to be contacted. Of these, 311 (21.2{\%} of those contacted) completed the survey. Over 80{\%} reported high satisfaction with content, format and mode of delivery and high satisfaction with items related to confidence and overdose reversal preparedness. Notably, 89.0{\%} of participants felt they had the knowledge and skills to intervene successfully posttraining compared to 20.3{\%} pretraining (z = −17.2, p <.001). Similarly, posttraining, 87.8{\%} of participants felt confident they could successfully intervene compared to 24.4{\%} pretraining (z = −15.9, p <.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the GetNaloxoneNow.org online training for laypeople.",
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