IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device

Ilya Rosenberg, Alexander Grau, Charles Hendee, Nadim Awad, Kenneth Perlin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Recently, there has been great interest in multi-touch interfaces. These have taken the form of optical systems such as Microsoft Surface [5] and Perceptive Pixel's FTIR display [3] as well as hand-held devices using capacitive sensors such as the Apple iPhone [1]. However, optical systems are inherently bulky while capacitive systems are only practical in small form factors and are limited in their application because they only respond to human touch. We have created a technology that enables the creation of Inexpensive Multi-Touch Pressure Acquisition Devices (IMPAD) which are paper-thin, flexible and can easily scale down to fit on a portable device or scale up to cover an entire table. These devices can sense varying levels of pressure at a resolution high enough to sense and distinguish multiple fingertips (Figures 1, 2), the tip of a pen or pencil and other objects. Other potential applications include writing pads, floor mats and entry indicators, bio-pressure sensors, musical instruments, baby monitoring, drafting tables, reconfigurable control panels, inventory tracking, portable electronic devices, hospital beds, construction materials, wheelchairs, sports equipment, sports clothing and tire pressure sensing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009
Pages3217-3222
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Apr 4 2009Apr 9 2009

Other

Other27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period4/4/094/9/09

Fingerprint

Sports
Optical systems
Hospital beds
Musical instruments
Capacitive sensors
Wheelchairs
Pressure sensors
Tires
Pixels
Display devices
Monitoring

Keywords

  • Bilinear
  • Flexible
  • FSR
  • Input device
  • LOTUS
  • Multi-touch
  • Pressure
  • Sensor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Rosenberg, I., Grau, A., Hendee, C., Awad, N., & Perlin, K. (2009). IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device. In Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009 (pp. 3217-3222) https://doi.org/10.1145/1520340.1520460

IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device. / Rosenberg, Ilya; Grau, Alexander; Hendee, Charles; Awad, Nadim; Perlin, Kenneth.

Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009. 2009. p. 3217-3222.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rosenberg, I, Grau, A, Hendee, C, Awad, N & Perlin, K 2009, IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device. in Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009. pp. 3217-3222, 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009, Boston, MA, United States, 4/4/09. https://doi.org/10.1145/1520340.1520460
Rosenberg I, Grau A, Hendee C, Awad N, Perlin K. IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device. In Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009. 2009. p. 3217-3222 https://doi.org/10.1145/1520340.1520460
Rosenberg, Ilya ; Grau, Alexander ; Hendee, Charles ; Awad, Nadim ; Perlin, Kenneth. / IMPAD - An inexpensive multi-touch Pressure Acquisition Device. Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009. 2009. pp. 3217-3222
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