Immigration and the constraints of justice: Between open borders and absolute sovereignty

Ryan Pevnick

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Abstract

    This book explores the constraints which justice imposes on immigration policy. Like liberal nationalists, Ryan Pevnick argues that citizens have special claims to the institutions of their states. However, the source of these special claims is located in the citizenry's ownership of state institutions rather than in a shared national identity. Citizens contribute to the construction and maintenance of institutions (by paying taxes and obeying the law), and as a result they have special claims to these institutions and a limited right to exclude outsiders. Pevnick shows that the resulting view justifies a set of policies – including support for certain types of guest worker programs – which is distinct from those supported by either liberal nationalists or advocates of open borders. His book provides a framework for considering a number of connected topics including issues related to self-determination, the scope of distributive justice and the significance of shared national identity.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Number of pages199
    ISBN (Electronic)9780511975134
    ISBN (Print)9780521768986
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    Justice
    Immigration
    Nationalists
    National Identity
    Sovereignty
    Tax
    Workers
    Distributive Justice
    Immigration Policy
    Self-determination
    Ownership
    Outsider

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)

    Cite this

    Immigration and the constraints of justice : Between open borders and absolute sovereignty. / Pevnick, Ryan.

    Cambridge University Press, 2011. 199 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

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