Immigrant workers

Health, law, and public policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Immigrant workers are a large segment of the lower echelon of the U.S. labor force, and as many as 3.6 to 6 million of these workers and their families are living in the U.S. illegally. This paper examines who the recent immigrants are; explains why their current situation in the U.S. is an important public health matter; discusses the ethical and policy issues stemming from their health needs and from illegal status; and concludes with a brief look at some implications of the Simpson-Mazzoli Immigration and Reform Act, currently before Congress. The paper suggests that the illegal status of undocumented workers intensifies their health risks; that the immigrants' responsibility for budget shortfalls in public services is not as clearcut as frequently assumed; and that legislation aimed at regulating the status of immigrant workers in the U.S. is unlikely to solve many of the central problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-514
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Politics, Policy and Law
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984

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health law
Public Policy
Health Policy
public policy
immigrant
worker
Emigration and Immigration
Health
Budgets
health risk
Legislation
labor force
Ethics
public service
immigration
budget
Public Health
public health
legislation
act

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Law
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Immigrant workers : Health, law, and public policy. / Guttmacher, Sally.

In: Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, Vol. 9, No. 3, 1984, p. 503-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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