Images of sexual stereotypes in rap videos and the health of African American female adolescents

Shani H. Peterson, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph DiClemente, Kathy Harrington, Susan Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to determine whether perceiving portrayals of sexual stereotypes in rap music videos was associated with adverse health outcomes among African American adolescent females. Methods: African American female adolescents (n = 522) were recruited from community venues. Adolescents completed a survey consisting of questions on sociodemographic characteristics, rap music video viewing habits, and a scale that assessed the primary predictor variable, portrayal of sexual stereotypes in rap music videos. Adolescents also completed an interview that assessed the health outcomes and provided urine for a marijuana screen. Results: In logistic regression analyses, adolescents who perceived more portrayals of sexual stereotypes in rap music videos were more likely to engage in binge drinking (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.32-11.04, p = 0.01), test positive for marijuana (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.19-9.85, p = 0.02), have multiple sexual partners (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.01-3.71, p = 0.04), and have a negative body image (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.02-2.26, p = 0.04). This is one of the first studies quantitatively examining the relationship between cultural images of sexual stereotypes in rap music videos and a spectrum of adverse health outcomes in African American female adolescents. Conclusions: Greater attention to this social issue may improve the health of all adolescent females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1157-1164
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume16
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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African Americans
Music
Health
Sexual Partners
Cannabis
Binge Drinking
Body Image
Habits
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Urine
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Images of sexual stereotypes in rap videos and the health of African American female adolescents. / Peterson, Shani H.; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph; Harrington, Kathy; Davies, Susan.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 16, No. 8, 01.10.2007, p. 1157-1164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peterson, Shani H. ; Wingood, Gina M. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Harrington, Kathy ; Davies, Susan. / Images of sexual stereotypes in rap videos and the health of African American female adolescents. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2007 ; Vol. 16, No. 8. pp. 1157-1164.
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